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Hello everyone. I seem to have run into another problem, and it is probably my fault again. I noticed that I could read from my NTFS partitions (where I keep ...
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  1. #1
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    Can't Write to an NTFS Drive


    Hello everyone. I seem to have run into another problem, and it is probably my fault again.

    I noticed that I could read from my NTFS partitions (where I keep all of my stuff), but I cannot modify any data on them. I did some research, and found out that I had to play with the /etc/fstab file to get that working, and I read what I was supposed to do. Here's my /etc/fstab file:
    Code:
    # This file is edited by fstab-sync - see 'man fstab-sync' for details
    /dev/hda5 / ext3 defaults 1 1
    /dev/hdc /mnt/cdrom iso9660 user,iocharset=iso8859-1,noauto,ro,exec,unhide 0 0
    /dev/hdd /mnt/cdrom2 auto umask=0,user,iocharset=iso8859-1,codepage=850,noauto,ro,exec,users 0 0
    /dev/hda1 /mnt/win_c ntfs user,rw,umask=0133,dmask=000  0 0
    /dev/hdb1 /mnt/win_c2 ntfs umask=0,nls=iso8859-1,ro 0 0
    none /proc proc defaults 0 0
    /dev/hda6 swap swap defaults 0 0
    I'd really appreciate it if anyone bothered to help me out here, and tell me what's wrong.

    Thanks for your time, I mean it.

    Luke

  2. #2
    Linux Guru Cabhan's Avatar
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    NTFS write support is not a safe option in Linux. We can read from NTFS drives, but writing, no no.

    Technically, you can write to NTFS drives. However, there are a number of restrictions. The file needs to be over a certain size, and it needs to be the same size afterwards as it was to begin with. Probably other stuff too.

    That said, I do not recommend enabling the write support. If you still want to, it can be done by modifying the kernel. Off the top of my head, I believe the option is under:

    Device Drivers --> Filesystems --> DOS Filesystems --> NTFS

  3. #3
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    Bah, getting into the kernel, huh?

    Alright, I didn't know that it was a problem. I just assumed Linux rigged it so that one could not just in case the user would do something dumb.

    Well, thanks for your time again!

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  5. #4
    Linux Guru bigtomrodney's Avatar
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    Have a look at Captive NTFS, may be of help to you...

  6. #5
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    ...

    if you're running a duel boot system and you want a shared drive (or shared drives) between linux and windows, why not try using FAT instead of NTFS?

  7. #6
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    this topic confuses me, because i also cannot write to my ntfs partition, but i'm networked to my bro's computer running xp, and i can send stuff to his shared folder all day long with no problem. he is formatted as ntfs.


  8. #7
    Linux Guru budman7's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 12twelve12
    this topic confuses me, because i also cannot write to my ntfs partition, but i'm networked to my bro's computer running xp, and i can send stuff to his shared folder all day long with no problem. he is formatted as ntfs.

    Two different things.
    One is a network share. Setup to be writable. Safe
    The other is directly writing to NTFS. Unsafe.

    You could create an extra partition on your hard drive, make it Fat32. Then Linux and Windows can both write to it.
    Use a livecd that has qtparted or whatever other partitioning tool you have.
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