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Hey, Is there a way to do this? Thanks...
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  1. #1
    Just Joined!
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    Viewing windows C: drive in mandrake move?


    Hey,

    Is there a way to do this?

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Linux User
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    Peterborough, UK
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    Yeah, though it changes depending on how the C: drive is formatted.

    Either way, you need to create a directory to mount the drive to and work out which partition the Windows drive is in. For the directory to mount it to, I recommend '/mnt/windows' or something similar. It's best to keep it in the /mnt/ directory. In order to do this, go to a console and type:
    Code:
    su -
    <enter root password>
    mkdir <Windows mount directory>
    Then, to determine which partition the C: drive is in, type:
    Code:
    fdisk -l
    This should give you an output that looks like this:
    Code:
       Device   Boot      Start         End      Blocks         Id   System
    /dev/sda1     *           1          13          104391        83   Linux
    /dev/sda2                14         268        2048287+    82   Linux swap / Solaris
    /dev/sda3               269       19457   154135642+  83   Linux
    One of the entries should have something different (either Windows, NTFS or FAT32, I can't remember which). Remember which device this corresponds to.

    If the C: drive is formatted using FAT32, you can then just type:
    Code:
    mount -t vfat <device> <Windows mount directory>
    You should now be able to see everything that was on the C: drive and modify it, by going to the Windows mount directory.

    If, however, the C: drive is formatted using NTFS, you need to type:
    Code:
    mount -t ntfs <device> <Windows mount directory>
    This may return an error about not recognising the filesystem. In this case, you will need to install NTFS support, but I'm not sure of the best way to do so in Mandrake, but I'm sure someone else can help you out. If it doesn't return an error, you should be able to read all of the files on the C: drive by going to the Windows mount directory. You will not, however, be able to write to it because Linux is incapable of safely writing to NTFS partitions.

    Hope this is helpful,
    Dan
    \"I am, after all,\" said Pooh, \"a bear of very little brain.\"
    MY PC: Athlon XP64 3000+ on a Asus K8V-X mobo w/1GB of non-descript RAM. AGP - GeForce 2 MX400. PCI - Creative Live! 5.1 soundcard. 140 GB and 120 GB SATA WD drives.

  3. #3
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    Thanks alot for the reply

    Now, When I go into the Windows folder in the mounted drive, then boot.ini and edit it, it wont because the permissions are set to read only. WHen I right click on the file, then permissions I am un able to change them Im un able to boot windows because boot.ini is stuffed.

    Thanks

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  5. #4
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    Maybe you could coopy over the boot.ini from the install cd to your hd?
    I am not very good with windows sorry.

  6. #5
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    Firstly, is it an NTFS or a FAT filesystem?

    Secondly, have you got Windows set up in your bootloader? And how do you know that the problem is specifically with boot.ini?
    \"I am, after all,\" said Pooh, \"a bear of very little brain.\"
    MY PC: Athlon XP64 3000+ on a Asus K8V-X mobo w/1GB of non-descript RAM. AGP - GeForce 2 MX400. PCI - Creative Live! 5.1 soundcard. 140 GB and 120 GB SATA WD drives.

  7. #6
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    It is NTFS and it is a boot.ini problem because it was my fault that I changed it

  8. #7
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    Well, you can't change anything on NTFS partitions because Microsoft have kept the format proprietory, so the current module for Linux hasn't got the safe capacity to write to them. You should, however, be able to burn a recovery CD/boot disk in Linux in order to repair the installation. However, I'm afraid I don't really know what you'd need on said disks...
    \"I am, after all,\" said Pooh, \"a bear of very little brain.\"
    MY PC: Athlon XP64 3000+ on a Asus K8V-X mobo w/1GB of non-descript RAM. AGP - GeForce 2 MX400. PCI - Creative Live! 5.1 soundcard. 140 GB and 120 GB SATA WD drives.

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