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Here is our setup: Our layout is fairly simple. We have 13 branches connected by frame relay to a central office. The central office uses addresses in the 192.168.1.0/24 scheme. ...
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  1. #1
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    Unable to ping other class-C networks.


    Here is our setup:

    Our layout is fairly simple. We have 13 branches connected by frame relay to a central office. The central office uses addresses in the 192.168.1.0/24 scheme. Each branch uses 192.168.2.0 thru 192.168.14.0 respectively. Each branch and central office use a Cisco 2500 series router to connect. The branches have no servers, so all servers reside on the 192.168.1.0 network. The central office router was originally setup for the branches to connect by telnet to a single Unix server at the central office (before my time). Our central office router is owned by our ISP, so we are unable to make changes without lots of "red tape". To work around this problem, we added routes to each Win2k server to reach the other networks. When we replaced one of these Win2k servers with a Linux, we tried to add routes to it similar to its predecessor. We thought we should be able to ping the branch networks once this was done, but all replies time-out. Our other servers can still ping the networks with no problem. We're a bit mystified at this point. Any help would be appreciated.

  2. #2
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    show us your routing table with a `route -n`. That would help us to know exactly what you have done.
    I respectfully decline the invitation to join your delusion.

  3. #3
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    Here it is....

    [root@lynayisa root]# route
    Kernel IP routing table
    Destination Gateway Genmask Flags Metric Ref Use Iface
    65.88.237.128 * 255.255.255.240 U 0 0 0 eth1
    192.168.4.0 192.168.1.252 255.255.255.0 UG 0 0 0 eth0
    192.168.3.0 192.168.1.252 255.255.255.0 UG 0 0 0 eth0
    192.168.2.0 192.168.1.252 255.255.255.0 UG 0 0 0 eth0
    192.168.1.0 * 255.255.255.0 U 0 0 0 eth0
    127.0.0.0 * 255.0.0.0 U 0 0 0 lo
    default 65.88.237.129 0.0.0.0 UG 0 0 0 eth1
    [root@lynayisa root]#

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  5. #4
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    Are you sure that you're routing through the correct interface, though? Is eth0 connected to the branch offices?

  6. #5
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    Yes, this server is acting as a firewall so the eth1 card is connected to the Internet and eth0 is the LAN connection to the branches (nothing in between other than the router and switches).

  7. #6
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    Do you have any other IP nodes between that server and the branch offices? If so, what's your traceroute output to there?

  8. #7
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    is 192.168.1.252 your frame relay gateway to the other boxes on your company network?
    I respectfully decline the invitation to join your delusion.

  9. #8
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    another idea, give us your routing tables of your windows boxes.
    I respectfully decline the invitation to join your delusion.

  10. #9
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    To answer some of the questions:

    1. IP Nodes - The only IP nodes between the Linux box and the branches are (1) the router for the Central Office frame connection and (2) the router connected to the frame at each respective branch. The routers convert to a class-A address (10.10.1.X) on the frame side and then change back to class-C on the host side.

    2. Gateway - 192.168.1.252 is the gateway for the Central Office router connected to the frame going to each site.

    3. Here is an example of one of the route tables on one Windows server:

    ================================================== =========================
    Active Routes:
    Network Destination Netmask Gateway Interface Metric
    0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 192.168.1.222 192.168.1.115 1
    127.0.0.0 255.0.0.0 127.0.0.1 127.0.0.1 1
    192.168.1.0 255.255.255.0 192.168.1.115 192.168.1.115 1
    192.168.1.115 255.255.255.255 127.0.0.1 127.0.0.1 1
    192.168.1.255 255.255.255.255 192.168.1.115 192.168.1.115 1
    192.168.2.0 255.255.255.0 192.168.1.252 192.168.1.115 1
    192.168.3.0 255.255.255.0 192.168.1.252 192.168.1.115 1
    192.168.4.0 255.255.255.0 192.168.1.252 192.168.1.115 1
    192.168.5.0 255.255.255.0 192.168.1.252 192.168.1.115 1
    192.168.6.0 255.255.255.0 192.168.1.252 192.168.1.115 1
    192.168.7.0 255.255.255.0 192.168.1.252 192.168.1.115 1
    192.168.8.0 255.255.255.0 192.168.1.252 192.168.1.115 1
    192.168.9.0 255.255.255.0 192.168.1.252 192.168.1.115 1
    192.168.10.0 255.255.255.0 192.168.1.252 192.168.1.115 1
    192.168.11.0 255.255.255.0 192.168.1.252 192.168.1.115 1
    192.168.12.0 255.255.255.0 192.168.1.252 192.168.1.115 1
    192.168.13.0 255.255.255.0 192.168.1.252 192.168.1.115 1
    192.168.14.0 255.255.255.0 192.168.1.252 192.168.1.115 1
    192.168.15.0 255.255.255.0 192.168.1.252 192.168.1.115 1
    192.168.16.0 255.255.255.0 192.168.1.252 192.168.1.115 1
    192.168.17.0 255.255.255.0 192.168.1.252 192.168.1.115 1
    192.168.18.0 255.255.255.0 192.168.1.252 192.168.1.115 1

    Default Gateway: 192.168.1.222
    ================================================== =========================
    Persistent Routes:
    Network Address Netmask Gateway Address Metric
    192.168.2.0 255.255.255.0 192.168.1.252 1
    192.168.3.0 255.255.255.0 192.168.1.252 1
    192.168.4.0 255.255.255.0 192.168.1.252 1
    192.168.5.0 255.255.255.0 192.168.1.252 1
    192.168.6.0 255.255.255.0 192.168.1.252 1
    192.168.7.0 255.255.255.0 192.168.1.252 1
    192.168.8.0 255.255.255.0 192.168.1.252 1
    192.168.9.0 255.255.255.0 192.168.1.252 1
    192.168.10.0 255.255.255.0 192.168.1.252 1
    192.168.11.0 255.255.255.0 192.168.1.252 1
    192.168.12.0 255.255.255.0 192.168.1.252 1
    192.168.13.0 255.255.255.0 192.168.1.252 1
    192.168.14.0 255.255.255.0 192.168.1.252 1
    192.168.15.0 255.255.255.0 192.168.1.252 1
    192.168.16.0 255.255.255.0 192.168.1.252 1
    192.168.17.0 255.255.255.0 192.168.1.252 1
    192.168.18.0 255.255.255.0 192.168.1.252 1

    C:\>

    I appreciate your help!

  11. #10
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    I wish there was a way to mark a conversation as "get back to me" cause I don't have time to read over everything now, and all I usually do is check for "new posts" Just try and remind me if it doesn't get answered in the next like day or so.
    I respectfully decline the invitation to join your delusion.

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