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I should be getting another old computer for free soon. About a 5 yr old PC. I will experiment then. Until it shows, I have bought a Unix book and ...
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  1. #11
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    I should be getting another old computer for free soon. About a 5 yr old PC. I will experiment then. Until it shows, I have bought a Unix book and started playing under a new user without admin abilities. One of the 1st things I have wondered, is why most of my directories and files have multiple users able to rwx. Seems sort of pointless for privacy, or if the computer is stolen...

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by larrinski
    One of the 1st things I have wondered, is why most of my directories and files have multiple users able to rwx. Seems sort of pointless for privacy, or if the computer is stolen...
    Most system directories and executables start out as 755 (rwxr-xr-x) and files start out as 644 (rw-r--r--) so that everyone can access it. If you want privacy for specific stuff you can always change permissions with chmod. If your computer is stolen (in fact, if anyone has physical access to your computer), permissions and passwords offer no security at all anyway.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by larrinski
    Seems sort of pointless for privacy, or if the computer is stolen...
    spoon! is right. If computer is stollen, having read-only permitions on files wont protect from accessing/modifying them. For example, one could use Knoppix CD to access hard disk, change permitions, and copy/modifying the files. One does not even need to know the root password as it can be reset without knowing the original.

  4. #14
    Linux Engineer d38dm8nw81k1ng's Avatar
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    you are running as admin? BAD *NIX USER! you should NEVER run as admin (or root in *NIX systems). why? because it is insecure. a virus attacking a root account can do anything, even replicate itself. without root privelages it can do damage to a normal user's account, even delete files. but nothing more. it can't touch other user's files and can't copy and send itself to other systems. the non-use of root is the reason *NIX viruses don't exist.
    Here's why Linux is easier than Windows:
    Package Managers! Apt-Get and Portage (among others) allow users to install programs MUCH easier than Windows can.
    Hardware Drivers. In SuSE, ALL the hardware is detected and installed automatically! How is this harder than Windows' constant disc changing and rebooting?

  5. #15
    Linux Newbie deek's Avatar
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    It seems that the point was somewhat brought up, but never really mentioned per se. If you have a mac, with os x, and want to learn unix stuff, especially command line, instead of putting a distro on your mac, just go to your bash terminal...as was mentioned, its a BSD under the hood, so you can spend you time getting familiar with command line stuff...which I think will go a long way.

    Basically, you don't need to install linux or anything else to play around with unix command lines on a mac...
    Join the Open Source Revolution. Support GNU/Linux.

    Find me at: www.deeksworld.com
    Registered GNU/Linux User #395777

  6. #16
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    I just bought a used ibook 1.2Ghz and created 2 partitions. the 1st is osx tiger with 40 Gb and 15gb will be for a linux distro. searches seem to bring up debian as the most popular and used linux for an ibook. ubuntu seems interesting though with free disks and all. Any suggestions now that I actually have a 2nd machine to play around with?

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by larrinski
    Any suggestions now that I actually have a 2nd machine to play around with?
    Debian (netinstall) would be my choice.

  8. #18
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    iBooks are New World Macs and basically any distro that supports PPC will work on it; including Yellow Dog, Debian, Ubuntu, Fedora Core, Mandriva, OpenSuse, Gentoo, etc. Yellow Dog has good support for certain Mac hardware.

  9. #19
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    I think that I will try the Debian distro 1st. Just downloading it now. Thanks for the advice.

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