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I switched over from XP a year ago as I was fed up with the viruses, spyware and slowness of the system. I bought an imac g5 and am now ...
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  1. #1
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    yup, I'm new... Wanting to install linux on a mac.


    I switched over from XP a year ago as I was fed up with the viruses, spyware and slowness of the system. I bought an imac g5 and am now comfortable in OSX, at least the graphical interface, install etc... I keep reading about Terminal/Darwin and a unix programmer I know said I should install Linux on my external HD and learn it first, as it is a derivative of unix... or that once I know Linux, unix will be an easy transition. From what I have read, this may be because Linux is a little bit more challenging to understand, with less of a focus on the point & click. What Linux can I install on the external HD ( a Pine 40Gb ) knowing that I am on a PowerPC, and how do I boot to it? I am pretty new to all this prompt stuff, but have an OK understanding of where my OSX directory & files are. I guess I should 1st start by partitioning my Pine HD. Would 20 Gb do? Thanks.

  2. #2
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    Re: yup, I'm new... Wanting to install linux on a mac.

    Quote Originally Posted by larrinski
    Would 20 Gb do?
    Yes it would do. I am just not sure which Linux (ppc) would install on g5 without problems.

  3. #3
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    Re: yup, I'm new... Wanting to install linux on a mac.

    Quote Originally Posted by larrinski
    I keep reading about Terminal/Darwin and a unix programmer I know said I should install Linux on my external HD and learn it first, as it is a derivative of unix... or that once I know Linux, unix will be an easy transition. From what I have read, this may be because Linux is a little bit more challenging to understand, with less of a focus on the point & click.
    Most of the tools in Darwin come from BSD, which is another Unix-like OS, like Linux. I don't see why Linux is more challenging to understand, but that is just me. Most of the development in new programs and graphical user interfaces in Unix-like OS's have occured in Linux; and so Linux should be more advanced than other Unix's in support of graphics and user interfaces.

    Quote Originally Posted by larrinski
    What Linux can I install on the external HD ( a Pine 40Gb ) knowing that I am on a PowerPC, and how do I boot to it? I am pretty new to all this prompt stuff, but have an OK understanding of where my OSX directory & files are. I guess I should 1st start by partitioning my Pine HD. Would 20 Gb do?
    Most of the major distributions support PowerPC: Yellow Dog, Debian, Fedora Core, OpenSUSE, Gentoo, and many others. When you install it usually puts a bootloader on your main hard drive; I don't know how that works for an external hard drive. 20GB should be plenty.

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    Thanks. A google search came up with Yellowdog Linux. Someone on a Mac/Unix forum suggested getting a "crappy PC" and installing Suse. I would prefer not to have to spend any more money than buying the Linux software. Will Yellowdog "see" my integrated display, airport express, & airport card?

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    Quote Originally Posted by larrinski
    Thanks. A google search came up with Yellowdog Linux. Someone on a Mac/Unix forum suggested getting a "crappy PC" and installing Suse. I would prefer not to have to spend any more money than buying the Linux software. Will Yellowdog "see" my integrated display, airport express, & airport card?
    I've heard many good stories about Yellow Dog. I would assume that it would work for you.
    But, if I were you, I would look for successful installations on g5 (not g3 or 4). g5 is new, therefore you want to find success story of someone who has already done that on the same machine. I would try Debian net install.

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    the fact that g5s are 64bit means that if it installs well on g4s it dont make much difference, as they are different archs

    as for distos
    look at
    yellow dog
    debian
    suse
    gentoo *daring*
    ubuntu


    also i feel the command line on macs are powerful enough
    i mean what do you really wana do?
    because macs run most of the same software as linux
    i use everything the same as on linux
    i use irssi, firefox, apache, ssh, gaim/audium, etc etc
    maybe look at fink as well
    that supplies apps with the specific libries that linux apps need


    as suggested dual boot will be the best way

  8. #7
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    I've heard good stories about Yellow Dog too, even for iBooks.

    Actually GNU/Linux is easier than BSD.

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    Quote Originally Posted by a thing
    I've heard good stories about Yellow Dog too, even for iBooks.

    Actually GNU/Linux is easier than BSD.
    how?
    i dont think there is too much difference atall
    between using my mac and my desktop/server

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    Good feedback. As per what I want to do, I would like to really learn Unix and/or Linux and get away from just knowing how to use the graphical interface, ie point and click. I want to understand the system, how it runs and how to ticker with it, and fix problems. Though this may get a chuckle out of more than a few of you, I have always had an interest in computers on a career front, but my career(s) have taken me on a different path... I have had a computer since the commodore 64, but never continued indepth learning as computers weren't a place to find a job back then(at least the small town where I came from).If I play around with Unix/Linux for a while, I will know if it really interests me to be able to want to change careers(if my skills are up to snuff...) Hopefully this makes sense. I have always felt comfortable with various OS's but really don't understand the technical backbone... I feel like I'm at a counselor!!

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    You will be alright. Just give it some time and you will learn it.

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