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Hello, I am planning to dual boot XP and Fedora Core 4. I know that usually, we format a part to NFTS for XP, and the leave the rest for ...
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  1. #1
    Just Joined! bonniehandi's Avatar
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    A harddisk space where XP and FC4 can both access


    Hello, I am planning to dual boot XP and Fedora Core 4. I know that usually, we format a part to NFTS for XP, and the leave the rest for linux. When we do this, XP has no access to the files in /home.

    I am wondering if there is a way to let XP and FC4 both access a common space on the hard disk, so I don't have to pass files from XP to FC4, or vice visa. Thank you very much.

  2. #2
    Linux Guru fingal's Avatar
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    Take a look at this.
    I am always doing that which I can not do, in order that I may learn how to do it. - Pablo Picasso

  3. #3
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    * FAT - Usually to share files between Linux and Windows, people set aside space for a FAT partition in addition to their NTFS and Linux partitions; since both Windows and Linux have very good read/write support for FAT
    * NTFS - Linux can read NTFS partitions (get the NTFS kernel module for FC)
    * ext2/ext3 - There are many tools on Windows that can read and/or write to ext2/ext3 partitions, including Explore2fs, ext2 IFS, and many others

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    Linux Guru bryansmith's Avatar
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    I use a FAT partition and it works like a charm (read/write access from both operating systems).

    If you are just looking to share, you can use the programs suggested by spoon!.

    Bryan
    Looking for a distro? Look here.
    "There can be no doubt that all our knowledge begins with experience." - Immanuel Kant (Critique of Pure Reason)
    Queen's University - Arts and Science 2008 (Sociology)
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  6. #5
    Just Joined! bonniehandi's Avatar
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    From the link from by fingal, it says:

    {<QUOTE}>
    Mounting the Windows Partition
    Preparation

    First, you need a directory, preferably off the root, that will represent the Windows files.

    Step 1 OPEN a terminal emulator.

    Step 2 TYPE cd /.

    Step 3 TYPE mkdir /WinRoot.

    Step 4 TYPE ls -l WinRoot.

    You should observe your newly created directory.

    Note: The name WinRoot was chosen to remind you that, although you are saving files to what appears to be a subdirectory of Linux, that subdirectory actually represents the root directory of the Windows system.
    Mounting the Windows Partition

    Step 1 TYPE B.

    Step 2 TYPE ls /WinRoot.

    You should observe all of the Windows system root directory files and subdirectories.

    Thatís it. Itís that simple. Now you have complete access to your Windows files.

    Donít use DOS commands in this directory. Use Linux commands. If you want to do file operations in this directory, use a graphical file manager to do your file operations.<{END OF QUOTE>}

    In step 1 in the second part. Why is it B???

  7. #6
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    There are also programs which let you read from and write to ext2/3 from Windows and NTFS from Linux. Namely, they are Ext2IFS, for Windows, and NTFS-captive, for Linux. Ext2IFS installs ext2/3 drivers on Windows and lets you mount Linux partitions as a drive. NTFS-captive, on the other hand "steals" drivers from your Windows install and uses them to write to the Windows partition. You kernel has to have support for reading before it will work, though. Beware: Windows doesn't know jack squat about Linux permissions, so you will have root access on the entire partition.
    ---sxeraverx---
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  8. #7
    Just Joined! bonniehandi's Avatar
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    This is going to sound really stupid.

    I have this space that is FAT16. I don't know how to get it to FAT32. AND NO, windows would not allow me to format it to FAT32. Neither would fedora core 4. Can someone tell me what to do?

    I also have no clue how to mount the FAT16 partition. I keep on looking at all the guides that teaches me how to do this sharing partition thing, and they say "mount it". Except I don't know how to mount it.

  9. #8
    Linux Engineer cheetahman's Avatar
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    Have you tried using QTParted to format it
    \"TTFN Taa Taa For Now\" by Tigger in Winnie the Pooh
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