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I want to set up an old computer (AMD K6-2, 400 MHz, 256 MB RAM) running Linux as a file server for two Windows XP machines on a home network. ...
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  1. #1
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    Setting Up Server for Home Network


    I want to set up an old computer (AMD K6-2, 400 MHz, 256 MB RAM) running Linux as a file server for two Windows XP machines on a home network. I have no plans to run it as a web or FTP server and don't need it for a router/firewall (separate D-Link box for that). I want the server to have a shared drive for multiple family members to access from the other two Windows machines, with folders for common documents, photos, and MP3s. I may also want to use it as a print server for an HP inkjet printer. I have a 4 GB hard drive for running the OS and a 80 GB drive for the shared drive.

    My questions:
    a. Is this a reasonable machine for this use?
    b. What file format should I use on the shared drive?
    c. Any major Linux modules other than Samba that I need to install?
    d. Can I do the install and maintenance via GUI?
    e. What security concerns do I need to address (given its use for home file serving and the presence of the hardware firewall)? If any, what software do you recommend?

    TIA for your input.

  2. #2
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    Which Distro for an old computer

    EDIT: Sorry, pressed the wrong button, didn't mean to post here.

  3. #3
    Linux Guru AlexK's Avatar
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    In answer to geewildman's questions:
    1. yes, just don't tell it to start a gui on startup and you can save some resources.
    2. Any Linux partition format should do, as the whole point of a samba server is so that windows clients can have read/write access to a linux system.
    3. If you want to make the configuration easier, take a look at swat and webmin. But these are not really required
    4. You can do it using one of the tools mentioned above. It also can be done from one of your other computers if the need arises.
    5. Since you are hiding behind a firewall, you should be safe.
    Life is complex, it has a real part and an imaginary part.

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