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BE SURE TO MAKE A /boot PARTION on the primary/master harddrive. It will save trouble later. It should be small (<1GB) and not have a journaling filesystem (like ext2), that ...
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  1. #11
    Linux Engineer
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    BE SURE TO MAKE A /boot PARTION on the primary/master harddrive. It will save trouble later. It should be small (<1GB) and not have a journaling filesystem (like ext2), that would be a waste of space.

    I think using all of one harddrive would be easiest.

  2. #12
    Linux Newbie
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    Your /boot partition should be no greater than 100mb. Mine is 32mb.
    --Dachnaz [Fuzzy Llama]

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by a thing
    BE SURE TO MAKE A /boot PARTION on the primary/master harddrive. It will save trouble later. It should be small (<1GB) and not have a journaling filesystem (like ext2), that would be a waste of space.

    I think using all of one harddrive would be easiest.
    Is this something I would have to do manually, or will the installer do it?

    Sorry for the questions, but I'm new to this whole linux thing and trying to understand all this new stuff at my age takes time

    --adam

  4. #14
    Linux Guru
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    Quote Originally Posted by nutznboltz2003
    Is this something I would have to do manually, or will the installer do it?
    The installer should give you a choice of "automatically" selecting the partitions to install on, or "manually" letting you have some input: choose manual. Then, assuming you have one big space where you want to put Linux, you will "delete" that partition and then create the new /boot, / (root), and swap partitions. That's when you will select the filesystem format (see above: ext2 is recommended for /boot, ext3 or reiserfs for / (root) and swap takes care of itself) as well as the size of the partitions. Make sure you know your partition layout beforehand, write stuff down, take your time and all will work out.
    /IMHO
    //got nothin'
    ///this use to look better

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