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Is that any file stores different port usage, for example, the port for apache?...
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  1. #1
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    port no


    Is that any file stores different port usage, for example, the port for apache?
    Proper Planing is a way of success

  2. #2
    Linux Guru smolloy's Avatar
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    I'm sure this information is online if you search for it. Did you search before posting??

    ...

    This link (CLICK HERE) is the first hit when I searched for "linux apache port" on google.

    Please search before posting.

    EDIT:: Read the first two links in my signature please.
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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by smolloy
    I'm sure this information is online if you search for it. Did you search before posting??

    ...

    This link (CLICK HERE) is the first hit when I searched for "linux apache port" on google.

    Please search before posting.

    EDIT:: Read the first two links in my signature please.
    yes, i can get it online, but as you know I'm change from windows to linux, because that is a file in Windows that stores all the port no for different application
    Proper Planing is a way of success

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  5. #4
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    to see what is currrent'y running and on what ports it's listening you can use netstat.

    netstat -al

    the file /etc/services has a listing of all the ports / names so you can cross-reference them, to determine that a service in the first listing such as netbios-ssn is port 139.


    while netstat -lp will show you what program has which port open..
    Code:
    Proto | Recv-Q | Send-Q | Local Address | Foreign Address | State |  PID/Program name
    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    tcp   |   0    |    0   | *:netbios-ssn  |    *:*        | LISTEN  |  3414/smbd
    far...out

  6. #5
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    Thks for ur reply
    Quote Originally Posted by farslayer
    to see what is currrent'y running and on what ports it's listening you can use netstat.

    netstat -al


    the file /etc/services has a listing of all the ports / names so you can cross-reference them, to determine that a service in the first listing such as netbios-ssn is port 139.


    while netstat -lp will show you what program has which port open..
    Code:
    Proto | Recv-Q | Send-Q | Local Address | Foreign Address | State |  PID/Program name
    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    tcp   |   0    |    0   | *:netbios-ssn  |    *:*        | LISTEN  |  3414/smbd
    Proper Planing is a way of success

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