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...and if so then why??? What makes Slackware the most Unix-like of all the *nix distros, what differences and similarities???...
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  1. #1
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    Is Slackware the most UNIX-like of all the Linux distro's???


    ...and if so then why???
    What makes Slackware the most Unix-like of all the *nix distros, what differences and similarities???

  2. #2
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    Well.. mostly because it uses BSD-style init scripts (they're in /etc/rc.d). Also, maybe because you've got to do most of the stuff by hand, you don't have many tools like you do on other distributions.
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    It's hard to say what "Unix-like" means exactly. I learned Bell Labs Unix version 7 on a PDP-11 26 years ago and I think there were variants even then

    But yes, probably the bsd-based distros (and flavors of bsd itself) are the most traditional. If slackware says it's "most Unix-like" then they've tried to be, which is not a very common goal of other distros.
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    I've always partly understood it to mean that the directory tree is very similar. Most distros are broadly similar in terms of their directory structure, but some of the more 'commercial' distros will change this to suit themselves.

    I don't suppose that's the whole picture, but it's what I always think of.

    EDIT: I was also curious enough about your question to Google around a bit. The answers I got were hopelessly vague, even on the Slackware site. It mentioned adhering closely to Linux standards (though Linux ain't UNIX).

    Some other sites also said that Slackware 'feels' the most UNIX-like and uses the same file compression algos. So I dunno.
    Last edited by fingal; 12-19-2005 at 08:02 PM.
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    According to Wikipedia, one aspect of the BSD-similarity is the init script system, as was mentioned (though System V, the more common Linux one, is now supported as well, evidentally).

    The Wikipedia article also mentions that Slackware complies with both BSD and POSIX standards, though I'm not entirely sure what "BSD standard" entails, or even if this is unique amongst Linux distros.

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    The dual POSIX/BSD compliance is not unusual, although it is becoming moreso. POSIX is simply a IEEE standard API for unix-like systems, offering basic thread/IO stuff...
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    Also, I read somewhere that Debian's roots go back as far as 1987, which is when the "GNU/HURD" project began, which later bacame "Debian/GNU/Linux". So, would the presence of a package manager (apt-get) in this distro keep it from being considered more "Unix-like"?

    So what about Debian's init scripts, are they BSD-like?? How much does Debian really differ from Slackware??

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    Quote Originally Posted by southpaw
    So, would the presence of a package manager (apt-get) in this distro keep it from being considered more "Unix-like"?
    Slackware also has a package manager, not sure what it's called but it uses a TGZ file. It's really not very advanced compared to others used today, but gets the job done.

    So what about Debian's init scripts, are they BSD-like?? How much does Debian really differ from Slackware??
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Runlevel

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    I believe "pkgtool" is the package management software which Slackware uses by default.

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    I've read that dependencies in slackware is something the user has to take care of.
    I also wondered what that description on distrowatch meant (and a statement often repeated in reviews). A friend of mine said that sometimes linuxes get closer and closer to windows. So perhaps it's Slackware is more like a DIY (do it yourself) system, which will suit your needs perfectly (eventually).

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