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Hello, I am sort-of a Linux newbie, and I am trying to find help on setting creating a duplicate of my hard drive. I have a Dell 8200 running a ...
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  1. #1
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    Help with creating a HDD mirror...


    Hello,
    I am sort-of a Linux newbie, and I am trying to find help on setting creating a duplicate of my hard drive.

    I have a Dell 8200 running a webserver via Debian Sarge 3.1. I have an (2) 80GB drives--one of which I would like to mirror the other. I have read a little about using the dd command to do so, but I am really uncomfortable doing this. In short I want to schedule this mirror to run in the evenings (daily). If my primary hdd fails, all I would have to do it physically replace it with the mirrored one.

    First off, is this possible? If so, could someone help me to create the script?

    Or if dd isn't the best solution could you recommend another. I do not currently have a raid config, but I have also read about rsync and such...

    Any help is greatly appreciated.

  2. #2
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    Any thoughts?

  3. #3
    Super Moderator Roxoff's Avatar
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    It seems like what you really want is RAID; I'm no expert on that, I'm afraid. But this is Linux, so you naturally have several options:

    If you're just taking a backup of the important system files, then tar might be the way to handle it, that's a bit like using zip from a command line, and it can do sequential backups, so you only archive the changed files on a daily basis, taking a complete backup less often.

    Or you could (as you rightly suggest) use rsync - that's geared for mirroring across networks, but it could do the job quite nicely.

    Dont forget the good old 'cp -a ...' command either.

    You can even set up a CVS repository on the extra disk space and check-in your config files when they change. If you re-install (following a system collapse/failure) you only have to tell it where your CVS repository is then check-out your config again.
    Linux user #126863 - see http://linuxcounter.net/

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