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hi, i would like to know what is the different between UNIX and Linux (in term of command) because i had read a book Called "Learning Linux Using UNIX". Where ...
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  1. #1
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    Linux and UNIX


    hi,
    i would like to know what is the different between UNIX and Linux (in term of command) because i had read a book Called "Learning Linux Using UNIX". Where it teach all about Linux, but all the parctical that i do is on UNIX system.
    Proper Planing is a way of success

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    Linux Engineer Nerderello's Avatar
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    Un1x is a copyrighted name. I'm struggling to remember which company has it, but that's why you'll see IBM calling their flavour AIX, and HP calling their's HPUX. They are all Un1x.

    Linux is another flavour of Un1x. If you learn Un1x, you'll find Linux to be very familiar, and vice versa.

    Suggest that you have a look at the tutorial section of this forum at the FAQs, as this is explained better there.

    have fun

    Nerderello

    Use Suse 10.1 and occasionally play with Kubuntu
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nerderello
    Un1x is a copyrighted name. I'm struggling to remember which company has it, but that's why you'll see IBM calling their flavour AIX, and HP calling their's HPUX. They are all Un1x.

    Linux is another flavour of Un1x. If you learn Un1x, you'll find Linux to be very familiar, and vice versa.

    Suggest that you have a look at the tutorial section of this forum at the FAQs, as this is explained better there.

    have fun

    Nerderello
    is all the command used by both OS is same?
    Proper Planing is a way of success

  4. #4
    Linux Engineer Nerderello's Avatar
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    yes, and no.

    The thing to understand here is that at the command line interface (CLI) most Un1xs and Linuxs have the same base set of commands. These commands are then added to by various people. So, you'll find that , for instance, on a Redhat version of Linux you can run (from the CLI) various redhat system config commands, that are not available on non-Redhat (or Fedora) versions. But the base set of commands (your "cd" and "ls" and "rm" etc.) are all the same.

    But then again, most people don't use the CLI, but a pretty GUI front end. This gui, however, is sitting in fron of all of the CLI type of stuff (well, almost). So most people use X (the name of the generic basic GUI software), with a window manager (WM) helping them out (X by itself is about as user friendly as the CLI). These WM come in varying degrees of sophistication. Most (but not all) Linux users use either Gnome or KDE (which are actually desktop environments rather than simple WM).

    To go back to your original question, yes, if you learn Un1x, you will be well placed to cope at the CLI of both Un1x and Linux.

    If you want to have a look at the tutorial section of this forum , you'll find some of the more command commands explained for you (see :- http://www.linuxforums.org/forum/t11...mand-line.html also see :- http://www.linuxforums.org/forum/t44...linux-faq.html and the Linux documentation project have many useful howtos , see :- http://www.tldp.org/guides.html ).

    have fun

    Nerderello

    Use Suse 10.1 and occasionally play with Kubuntu
    Also have Windows 98SE and BeOS

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    Linux Guru techieMoe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nerderello
    Un1x is a copyrighted name. I'm struggling to remember which company has it, but that's why you'll see IBM calling their flavour AIX, and HP calling their's HPUX. They are all Un1x.
    The Open Group owns the rights to the UNIX trademark, if I remember correctly. In order for a company to call their operating system "UNIX", they adhere to some set standards and pay The Open Group a fee.

    http://www.unix.org/what_is_unix.html
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  6. #6
    scm
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    Un1x is a copyrighted name. I'm struggling to remember which company has it, but that's why you'll see IBM calling their flavour AIX, and HP calling their's HPUX. They are all Un1x.

    Linux is another flavour of Un1x
    Not quite. AIX and HPUX (among others) are flavours of UNIX (UNIX is the registered name, BTW, all caps) since they're derived from the original AT&T (Bell Labs) code base. Linux isn't a flavour of UNIX, it's a reimplementation from scratch which behaves like a UNIX system (more or less).

    Regarding commands, in my experience, Linux commands are pretty much compatible with their UNIX equivalents, but the reverse is often not the case as Linux implementors tend to add features that are not present in the originals (sed's option to edit a file in situ is a case point). Also there are some commands in Linux that do not have a direct UNIX equivalent, such as stat. That said, the transition between the two systems is pretty easy, an you'll soon get the hang of the limitations of each.

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    Just Joined! brother_mick's Avatar
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    In the Un1x/Linux world how does POSIX come in. I know it is a standard of sorts and costs $$$`s, but in relation to linux what is it/Who own`s it ???

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    Linux Enthusiast scientica's Avatar
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    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/POSIX should explain most of POSIX. In short, POSIX is a stanard for writing a portable OS, or rather an interface of the OS so that HLL (High Level Programs) more or less only should need re-compilation to work a different hardware/architecture (well, at leat in theory, few programs are fully platform independant, programmers tend to make use of platform specific features (both bugs and asstets)). Eg, a simple text-mode editor for linux x86 should, given that it follows the POSIX and uses nothing but stanards API calls,etc and is written in some language like C(99), should be able to run on G5 running OSX after beeing compiled.

    Afaik both linux and UNIX are trying to be POSIX compilant, as well as OSX (Machintosh), and I think that to a certain extent Windows (well atleast Win32 was partially) POSIX compilant in some parts, though I don't think the coders at MS are whipped for not writing POSIX code...
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    Linux User twoHats's Avatar
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    Shells ...

    The only thing i havn't seen mentioned is the shell. Running different CL shells can have a pretty heavy impact - so if you are practicing Linux on UNIX - be sure to run the same shell on UNIX that is being run on the target Linux system (usually BASH).

    HTH
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    finally - hw to brag about - but next year it will look pitifully quaint:
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  10. #10
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    thank you for participating in this, i have some ideas now.
    Proper Planing is a way of success

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