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Hey all I was just browsing the internet and distrowatch, and came across Arch Linux. OK, so it isnt the easiest to install distro on the planet, but I would ...
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  1. #1
    Just Joined! ~tux~'s Avatar
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    Arch Linux?


    Hey all

    I was just browsing the internet and distrowatch, and came across Arch Linux. OK, so it isnt the easiest to install distro on the planet, but I would say it would be more straightfoward than a Gentoo install. I was curious about Arch as I think I would learn a lot from it. I guess if you followed the documentation for the arch distro, it wouldnt be TOO hard would it?? Any suggestions?

    Cheers

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    Arch Linux' installation is not difficult IIRC, you possibly had to use (c)fdisk to setup partitions which is arguably the most difficult thing you would have had to do.

    I liked Arch, it has many common aims/philosophies as Slackware of most of which I agree with. It's compiled with an i686 processor which supposedly makes it faster but I didn't notice anything.

    However, like Slackware (and Gentoo), it doesn't do everything (or much :P) for you, you're required to have a basic knowledge of whats going on and how to change this according to what you prefer. This becomes easier as time increases.

    What made me come back to Slackware from Arch Linux is its package manager, pacman.

    When I installed gAIM it also installed GnuPG which I don't think is a dependancy, I didn't like this. Sure, I practice in using cryptography and am planning on studying all the modules relating to crytography in the Maths degree I'll be studying next year but I hated how it installed something which I don't think was *necessary* to run the program. This may seem like a stupid point but I like having control over what is installed and what's not. I just wished Slackware had a larger repository

  3. #3
    oz
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    Arch has been my default distro for about a year now. I've successfully installed Gentoo 4 or 5 different times and it's very good, but it's too time intensive for my tastes, so Arch fills my needs quite well. No, it's not all that hard to install, but at the moment lots of things seem to be getting broken for both, fresh installs and upgrades. It has to do with some new stuff in the latest kernels, udev, and initrd. If you are experimental by nature, I'd say go for it. Otherwise, you might want to wait for the next release (Arch 7.1) which is due for release just any time now.

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    Linux Guru bryansmith's Avatar
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    Arch = awesomeness. If you like bleeding edge, then Arch is perfect. KDE 3.5.0 packages were up the day KDE 3.5.0 was released. Kernel 2.6.15 was up the day it was released (caused me a minor problem but was easily fixed).

    Like Ozar said, there are some transistions being undergone right now (hotplug to udev is one) and it is a little tricky. With pacman though, the transition is easy (IMHO) because it tells you everything it is doing and what needs to be changed.

    I think you should definetly give it a try if you consider yourself at least an intermediate Linux user.

    Bryan

    BTW, it is Arch 0.7.1 that is going to be released soon, not 7.1 . Just so we don't all get confused.
    Looking for a distro? Look here.
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    oz
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    Quote Originally Posted by bryansmith
    BTW, it is Arch 0.7.1 that is going to be released soon, not 7.1 . Just so we don't all get confused.
    Picky, picky, picky... all I did was leave off a zero and a very small dot!

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    Linux User St. Joe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ~tux~
    I was curious about Arch as I think I would learn a lot from it. I guess if you followed the documentation for the arch distro, it wouldnt be TOO hard would it?? Any suggestions?
    Suggestions? Just make sure you know your hardware as a lot of the configuration will be done by hand. The installer will prompt you for most of these changes. If you have run another Linux brand you won't have too much difficulty, and the Arch forums are very helpful to new users. But it is definitely no cakewalk, as you will have to down in the pits to get it running and your hardware working properly.
    It may be that your sole purpose in life is simply to serve as a warning to others.

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    Just Joined! ~tux~'s Avatar
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    thanks for your replies guys

    I'll be doing a bit more research on Arch

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    Linux Guru bryansmith's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ozar
    Picky, picky, picky... all I did was leave off a zero and a very small dot!
    Just never let it happen again!

    Just kidding...

    Bryan
    Looking for a distro? Look here.
    "There can be no doubt that all our knowledge begins with experience." - Immanuel Kant (Critique of Pure Reason)
    Queen's University - Arts and Science 2008 (Sociology)
    Registered Linux User #386147.

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    Just Joined! ~tux~'s Avatar
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    Oh another question (thanks for you replies though)

    Arch linux is made for i686 processors, but how do you know if you are running that? I have a 2.4 Ghz Celeron, but I have no idea what kind of architecture the processor is.

    Cheers

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    Quote Originally Posted by ~tux~
    Oh another question (thanks for you replies though)

    Arch linux is made for i686 processors, but how do you know if you are running that? I have a 2.4 Ghz Celeron, but I have no idea what kind of architecture the processor is.

    Cheers
    that's an i686....P4's, celerons, Athlons, etc are. i586 is the AMD K6 and PII's i believe, older than that i can't remember off the top of my head.

    you do have an i686 processor though

    i use a variation of arch linux myself and really like it. i had trouble installing arch earlier (couldn't get it to upgrade than restart successfully....had trouble switching to udev) so i now use underground linux. the install is pretty aggressive though but is great if that's all you want (it asks very few questions during install and makes a lot of assumptions...so i'm not sure how well it plays with other OS's). it's my only OS and is essentially an updated arch install that comes with KDE and is very easy to install

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