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  2. #12
    Linux Guru Cabhan's Avatar
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    Jan 2005
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    Seattle, WA, USA
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    Quote Originally Posted by noescasa
    I can access things, I just can't write, copy etc. I don't see how i could have screwed up the install considering i did everything just as it told me to. Also, I couldn't have screwed up the root account because I haven't been able to use it.

    That command line thing worked well, but unfortunately, that only seems to be a temporary solution.
    I apologize: I misunderstood and misread your problem.

    You are not supposed to be able to access anything except the /home/user folder. Every other folder on your computer is a system directory that only root can access.

    Now then, you say you are the only user. This is true. However, you do not want to operate with root permissions, as this is extremely insecure.

    Let's say that you have root permissions, and you execute malicious code somehow that executes "rm -Rf /". You have just deleted every single file on your computer.

    Now let's say that you have regular permissions and execute that same code. You have deleted ONLY your home directory, and everything else: settings, installed programs, etc. is still perfectly safe.

    If you need to do something as root (for example, install a program), you can prefix the command with 'sudo' in order to execute it as though you were root.

    In most distros, the way to do this is to run the 'su' command, which would basically switch you into the root account for that session. However, Ubuntu intentionally cripples su because they see it as being a vulnerability.

    If you wish to enable su, you can do:
    Code:
    sudo passwd root
    <enter root password>
    <enter root password again>
    After that, you should be able to use 'su'.


    I understand what you want to do: be root always. This is a SEVERE security problem, and is HIGHLY discouraged.

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