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I checked out the pinned topic, but the link to the irc channel didnt' work, and the first link didn't have a review of the popular Redhat. I remember I ...
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  1. #1
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    Another Which distro: only for learning linux and q3 based games


    I checked out the pinned topic, but the link to the irc channel didnt' work, and the first link didn't have a review of the popular Redhat.

    I remember I installed Suse maybe a year ago. Funny thing was I tried the live CD first and it detected all my hardware and looked great. When I installed the distro it didn't seem to detect everything as the live cd had, and after I tried to configure my monitor, I couldn't boot into a gui anymore.

    I gave up at that point, but I'm looking to give it another shot. Basicly I'm looking for a friendly linux distro that I can learn from, that is dual boot friendly, and can run a few q3 engine games. Like ET, RTCW, Q3, and SOF2. I hear the performance is better on Linux, I want to see for myself!

  2. #2
    Just Joined! ~tux~'s Avatar
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    You really need to do more research then that. Distrowatch is a great place to learn about different distros. Also try google and PLEASE search the forums. This question has been answered COUNTLESS of times.

  3. #3
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    Of the distributions I've used I believe Slackware is the best for learning, and, like most distributions, it will run q3 fine.

  4. #4
    sbn
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    I am thinking a better source would be to try File Front's games forum (http://forums.filefront.com) as I am sure a lot of people there would be familiar running Q3 games for Linux. Of the top of my head, I would say Ubuntu or Kubunto would most likely be the best start. These distros seem to be more geared to the home user. Suse on the other hand is probably the most-refined (professional) distro, in my opinion.

    One option is you could try out different distros in a virtual pc. Come Monday EMC is going to anounce that GSX server will be made available for free. You could install that in Windows, then load up some different distros. -VMware (http://www.vmware.com/). At the moment you can download an Ubuntu and Suse vmware image and load them up in the free VMWare player.

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