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I don't yet have the laptop that I will be installing Linux on so I may be asking this for no reason (I may find the answer once I begin ...
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  1. #1
    Just Joined! TxMarine's Avatar
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    Angry Still confused on "Partioning"


    I don't yet have the laptop that I will be installing Linux on so I may be asking this for no reason (I may find the answer once I begin the install process). I've been doing a lot of reading up on Linux use for the last few weeks and I'm still lost on the idea of partitioning your HD. Can someone please explain. I'm just trying to learn as much as I can before I attempt to install and run Linux. Thanks in advance.

  2. #2
    Linux Guru Cabhan's Avatar
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    Partitioning? Sure.

    Your computer does not see your hard drive as a single drive. Rather, it is a drive with one or more partitions. Many people have a single drive with a single partition, and so imagine that the whole drive is being seen.

    In Windows, you really only need a single partition. In Linux, we use multiple partitions. A typical system might have:

    Partition 1: /
    Partition 2: swap (a sort of extension of RAM)
    Partition 3: /boot

    Each of these is its own self-contained unit on the hard drive. For example, I might allocate 20 GB to /, 1 GB to swap, and 500 MB to /boot. In this way, we make a sort of mini-drive within the hard drive.

    Partitions also have a fairly simple naming scheme. There is one for standard IDE/PATA drives, and one for SATA drives.

    For IDE/PATA drives, the scheme is:

    hd#$, where # is the hard drive, and $ is the partition. So hda3 is the 3rd partition on the 1st drive, while hdc1 is the 1st partition on the 3rd drive.

    For SATA drives, it's almost identical, except the 'h' is replaced by 's'. So if you have an odd combo of PATA and SATA, you might have:

    hda
    hdb
    sda

    I realize this doesn't cover everything, so please ask any other questions you may have.

  3. #3
    Linux Guru budman7's Avatar
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    Which distro are you going to install?
    There are some distros that will do the partitioning for you.
    Suse and Fedora will do this, if you don't like there proposal, you can change it.
    Qtparted and Disk druid are 2 very good partitioners.
    Another good partitioner is cfdisk.
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  5. #4
    Just Joined! TxMarine's Avatar
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    Thanks, really makes the whole idea seem a lot less complex.

    I plan on running Fedora Core 4. So this will automatically set up the partitions for me?

  6. #5
    Linux Guru Cabhan's Avatar
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    Yes, FC will handle it for you. Most partitions have the option for automatic partitioning.

  7. #6
    Linux User Tommaso's Avatar
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    Installing Fedora Core is actually pretty easy. I did it succesfully without any previous knoledge, but i did find that the fedora tutorial is very helpful. You can find it here: http://fedora.redhat.com/docs/fedora...-guide-en/fc4/

    It will guide you through all the steps involved in the install.

    Good Luck getting Fedora Installed. Its a great distro, and i hope that you will enjoy it. Oh, an the yes, the installer can be set so that it will do all the partitioning for you, so no need to worry about it.

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