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Hello i'm a windows user who is looking to switch over to linux because of its amazing capabilities. I have narrowed down my choices to mandriva 2006, linspire 5.0, and ...
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  1. #1
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    the final choice


    Hello i'm a windows user who is looking to switch over to linux because of its amazing capabilities. I have narrowed down my choices to mandriva 2006, linspire 5.0, and kubuntu. When i get more expireience maybe knoppix. I know linspire has CNR but i've heard its not very good for a permanent switch. I thought it was alright. Mandriva i really liked but i'm not sure if it supports everything. kubuntu is there with mandirva but i could not find a lot of information on it. i want to go with one of these, unless someone suggest any other ones that i should take into consideration. Which one do you think is best. I am installing them on a toshiba laptop. Not very old just 2 years old. Give me your thoughts.

  2. #2
    Linux Guru Cabhan's Avatar
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    Kubuntu is the same thing as Ubuntu, just using the KDE desktop. So try looking for info on Ubuntu and you'll find a lot more.

    I'm not a huge Mandriva fan, so I can't really recommend them. I've had some difficulties in the past, and their package manager isn't so great.

    Ubuntu is often recommended for new users, and while I've never used it, some people swear by it. I don't recommend it as a long-term distro (if you like its capabilities, check out Debian once you're more experienced), but it may be a good start-up.

    Also, be aware that Knoppix is a LiveCD, and that it is meant to be run from a CD. If you are thinking about "upgrading" to it, again check out Debian instead. Both Ubuntu and Knoppix are based on Debian.

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    I concur with Cabhan... I too started my Linux adventure a few years ago with Mandrake (which is now Mandriva), and then later made the switch to Debian and found the package management (which it shares with Ubuntu) far superior. Granted that was a few years ago, so take it with a grain of salt.

    However, I recently got a friend started on Ubuntu, and his experience was pretty smooth--there is alot to learn but once you have the basics like package management down you can tackle them all in time.

    In the end it's very subjective, but between Mandriva and Ubuntu I'd recommend the latter. Learn how APT works and you'll likely be convinced, as well. Between Ubuntu/Kubuntu is your call. Just Google "Gnome vs. KDE" and you're sure to find a slew of information on what these two choices are about... as far as I know that is the only real difference between Ubuntu and its KDE counterpart.

    Good luck!

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    i did my research and i'm going to with mandriva for now until i get used to linux, because there i can switch back and forth between gnome and kde. I read a lot of articles and found the world of linux is amazing, i can't belive i haven't strated before. But yes i'm going switch back and forth. Because really the desktop was what i thought was different. I'm guessing debian is more complicated but as soon as i learn more linux ( i have the 2006 bible and other pdfs) i'll switch to debian. the only thing is that gnome reminds me so much of apple - but other than that i still need to explore and understand linux more. A couple of more questions if you don't mind. Can any linux os be changed into different desktop enviroment ubuntu and kubunutu for example. As long as you have ubuntu you can download the kde packad=ge. And why mandriva ..... faulty.... thanxz please give me all advice possible even if it doesn't pertain exactly to my questions

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    Mandriva is never a bad choice, so don't worry about it being too "faulty" or anything. I'm personally just not too familiar with its package management system--but it seems to be quite good enough for alot of people.

    In short, any Linux OS with the proper X server installed will be able to use both desktop environments. So, if you have one you can get the other. In almost all cases they will be available as packages, but in some less-robust distributions you might have to build from source. I doubt you'll run into one of those, though.

    My advice? Most important: Don't be afraid of the command line. Desktop environments are very nice looking but it's important to do some work under the hood as well. Too many people associate a black screen with white text as a sign of "oldness", but it's where you'll find the true power of Linux.

    Also, once you've settled in and have your day-to-day use squared away, check out some information on compiling your own kernel (try to get specific directions for your distribution). It's really not that difficult and you'll find it rewarding, possibly addictive, and good for a big performance boost--particularly in a laptop.

    That's all I've got for now... sounds like you have the right attitude, so go have some fun! And of course, don't be afraid to ask more questions... that's the point of this place .

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    Linux Newbie daacosta's Avatar
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    Red face

    Well, I would have liked to be as inquisitive as you are and to have done my homework before trying distros like a hairy monkey

    I guess that's part of learning and I don't regret having tried Xandros, Fedora Core, Debian, Ubuntu, PC BSD, Nexenta, Mandriva and Damn Small Linux. I stuck to Ubuntu and Damn Small Linux but I learned to appreciate and respect Fedora Core.

    I wish I had more time to really learn Debian, Free BSD, or any other operating systems but on a daily basis Ubuntu does what I want the way I want. Sure, it is idiot proof and since I am an idiot regarding Linux, I guess I can live with Ubuntu and be productive with it.

    Kubuntu is the same as Ubuntu but using the Kool Desktop Environment (KDE) while Ubuntu uses GNOME. For me it is just a matter of preference and a subjective issue (I like GNOME myself but I also think highly of KDE which does whatever you want, the way you want )

    I didn't have luck with Mandriva 2006. It installed well, detected all my hardware, and was kick ass fast... But it thought that I was connected to the Internet via ethernet (the port is there but I don't use it...) instead of dial up... I managed to dial up with my external modem but, I couldn't browse any webpages so... No Mandriva for me. I guess that we all have different experiences with different distros.

    Don't discard KUbuntu (or Ubuntu) in the future and take it as a platform to learn Debian (That is my goal... Learn Debian...) The more you play with Linux the more you realize that you know nothing Seriously, this is a growing field and a great community...



    Good luck with your endeavors!
    -D-

    Registered User # 402675

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    Yes, from what I've seen/used of Ubuntu it's not just a learning distro. It has many packages that haven't even been worked into Debian experimental yet, like the much anticipated Xgl server that I had to build from source .

    Using Debian or FreeBSD is not difficult... My personal Linux/BSD path has taken me through Mandrake, FreeBSD, and Debian in that order. Most installers are good enough now (yes, even Debian's ) that you can get a system going with little difficulty. It's the day-to-day stuff and advanced configuration that'll get you. Ubuntu is better here in using the "sudo" command instead of the root account. That's what can make Debian a pain--you have alot more opportunities to mess things up. But really, that's what makes it fun. When you've got some time to spare, try it and you'll see .

    But anyway I'm off topic now. Let us know how Mandriva goes edman.

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    Quote Originally Posted by edman2478411
    i did my research and i'm going to with mandriva for now until i get used to linux, because there i can switch back and forth between gnome and kde.
    Just so you know when you install Debian and selecty Desktop Environment during install , Debian installs Both Gnome and KDE by default you can simply select which one you want to use when you log in.. or any of 3 dozen other desktops you wish to try... (you'll learn about that later as well )

    the part about Debian that throws most people is the text based installer, it's not all pretty like the graphical Installers for other distros. heres a nice screenshot walkthrough of the debian installer http://shots.osdir.com/slideshows/sl...se=184&slide=1

    Have fun with Linux it's a bit of a lerning curve after working with windows for years, but if you stick with it, I'm sure you'll come to really love it.
    far...out

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