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i plan to buy a network card for a redhat 9 box....any recommendations which one I shud buy keeping in mind the ease of installing and configuring and the price...lol...
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  1. #1
    Linux User
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    network card


    i plan to buy a network card for a redhat 9 box....any recommendations which one I shud buy keeping in mind the ease of installing and configuring and the price...lol
    Fixing Unix is better than working with Windows.
    http://nikhilk.homedns.org/projects/index.html

  2. #2
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    I've never seen that matter in fact. Whatever NIC I've bought, it has always been possible to make it work with almost no troubles at all.

  3. #3
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    yeah...i guess so...i jus wanted to know if anyone here had, if at all any issues with any particular n/w card..
    Fixing Unix is better than working with Windows.
    http://nikhilk.homedns.org/projects/index.html

  4. #4
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    The typical 10/100 network cards are pretty well supported. I personally own about 30 some network cards(I don't know where they all came from), and only a few of them don't work with Linux. I've only had one or two not work in Linux at all.

    I've got one right here actually that was in a used AlphaServer I got a while back. It says "ETHERWORKS TURBO PCI CONTROLLER DE435". I know for sure that this wasn't recognized when I tried to install Debian on that thing, although the card itself might just be dead. I didn't try it on anything else.

    The only other time I can think of was a model of card I tried to use in some big Compaq Proliant boxen. It wouldn't work, so I swapped it out for an intel EEPro 10/100, although I probably just didn't know the right module to load.

    So Linux has very good support overall. Of course, if you want to use some other kind of NIC, like a 1000, 10000, FDDI, token ring, etc... they might not be as completely supported.

  5. #5
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    3Com

    Buy a 3C905B from 3Com.
    Linux recognized it immediately.

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