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Originally Posted by lealoc Ahem, I've just read the article "Linux is Not Windows" ( http://linux.oneandoneis2.org/LNW.htm ). That is a very good read lealoc! Thanks for sharing!...
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  1. #11
    Trusted Penguin Dapper Dan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lealoc
    Ahem, I've just read the article "Linux is Not Windows" (http://linux.oneandoneis2.org/LNW.htm).
    That is a very good read lealoc! Thanks for sharing!
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  2. #12
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    I must commend Code Root in his previous posts, how true it is.... I only wish that I could have put it so well. You should be an evangelist!

  3. #13
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    I must commend Code Root in his previous posts, how true it is.... I only wish that I could have put it so well. You should be an evangelist!
    Thank you (I think... )

  4. #14
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    Stick with it lealoc! I've been using linux for going on 3 months, and I still come to these forums now and again to vent to the pros. But at the same time I have learned an incredible amount about computers in general. My trick to keep down frustration is I configured my desktop to dual boot windows and fedora core. I'd hit up fedora to learn some linux, then head back to windows to do basic computing. Now after just a few months I have become extremely comfortable with numerous distributions of linux. I still hop over to windows now and again to play counterstrike, add songs to the ipod and watch dvds. It's possible to do all of these on linux, but the trick is not to rush it. I have zero background in IT and I'm picking up nicely. If in January you asked me what eth0, a filesystem, or even a kernal was I'd give you one confused look. Now I can explain each one with much detail. Those are just a few examples. Stick with it and just HAVE FUN! Save the hard work and headaces for the pros, then in a few months/years start to get your hands dirty.
    10" Sony Vaio SRX99P 850MHz P3-M 256MB RAM 20GB HD : ArchLinux
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  5. #15
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    Easy Fix Advice From Another n00b

    I'm also a n00b and was feeling just as frustrated mostly because most of these guys want to keep everyone using Linux totally Open Source and pure without using anything proprietory, which basically leaves you with a neutered machine. I say screw the nuances of licensing issues, I just want a machine that works. Read the post at http://www.thejemreport.com/mambo/content/view/178/42/ , follow the directions for adding the pacman and other sources, and you'l be able to play mp3s, DVDs, use .wmv formats on the web, and use just about anything regardless of codec. I love Linux, but the Richard Stallman-ist purists are killing it with their OSS mantra. Use whatever works instead and be happy. R/Sly

  6. #16
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    Hi all,

    Here's a followup to my previous posts. Hopefully, other noobs like me will take heart from my frustrations and take the good advice I was given: persevere!

    Sly, I eventually used the amazing JemReport article to "hack" Suse to get all the media stuff working and it's been brilliant so far. DVD's and mp3's all work as they should after following the beginner friendly instructions

    Well, I've had Suse running on the laptop for a couple of weeks now (since my initial rant here) and am beginning to get into it a little more. Things make slightly more sense than they did just by reading the docs online when I need help and by playing with everything I have installed. If I break it, then fine I'll just reinstall and start again. All the things I need to keep are stored on my external USB hard drive and Yast does a great job of just updating and installing all the extras and updates as required. Fantastic.

    I have to say, I'm falling in love with Linux slowy but surely. It's just such a pleasure to use once you work out the basic differences between it and Mr Gates' poor offerings. Ok, that's slightly unfair as Windows does have some good points (no, I won't list them ). The power available to the user (albeit behind the loverly gui of KDE) is incredible compared to Windows and I've yet to experience a crash, which is a revelation in itself! One of the things I've always hated about Windows, particularly since XP came along, is the hand holding. I suppose I could be considered an experienced IT professional and as such prefer not to be patronised by stupid pop up messages and the hiding of all the useful config apps behind warning messages etc. Linux goes the opposite way to some extent. It hands the user the reins and just lets you jump in with both feet (sorry for the mixed metaphor!). That's great on one level as it means you can tweak everything exactly as you want it without being asked over and over whether you're sure you want to do it. But, it also means that Linux is rather easy to break if you don't know what you're doing (as I've found out a few times now). The learning curve is very steep, even for someone with my experience, but I now realise it's almost impossible to bring my Microsoft experience to bear on Linux. I'm still very much a noob. The OS's are so different, I may as well be starting anew. That's a good thing though as it's making me think for myself for a change.

    The only drawback I've encountered is that Suse is using almost all my 512Mb RAM with no apps running. However, the slowdown when I have a few programs open is certainly not as noticeable as it was when I had Windows installed. I'm sure there are a number of unnecessary services running that I could disable to free up more RAM, but I'm still not clear on what many of them do and which are needed. In fact, I only noticed the amount of RAM being used when I discovered the wonderful "top" command last week. I'd been running Suse for a week with 2 desktops and lots of apps open with no real problems, so the memory issue is one I can live with.

    While I was away (staying with relatives for a 60th birthday party) I realised I'd forgotten to install the drivers for my digital camera and had no Internet access there. As the memory card was full, I decided to see if Suse would recognise it as an external drive. With my fingers crossed I plugged it in. My jaw dropped when it not only recognised that it was actually a camera I'd connected, but also the make! It just worked without any complaints or messing around. It made my day to be able to upload the pics to show everyone on the laptop screen and to free up the memory card for more.

    The directory structure is still one thing that I'm struggling with, but I've worked out the bits of it I need to know for the moment. Application installation is also hard work. I'm relying on rpm's and Yast, but know I'm going to have to learn other methods at some point. I've tried playing around with tar.gz downloads, but without the knowledge of where things should be installed and all the arcane command line options, it's difficult to understand. I also discovered Wine last week. It's great to be able to play my old Windows games...erm I mean use my Windows productivity software on Linux!!

    So, I admit it, I'm a convert. I will be installing other distro's now that I've got a bit more of an idea of how things work to see if I like any of them better than Suse. The trouble is, I've got it working so well on the laptop now that I'm reluctant to part with it hehe! But, I do have a spare PC I intend to use to test with. Distrowatch is getting a lot of hits from me at the moment, but the trouble is, I'm used to having a choice of one OS. Now, I'm like a kid in a sweet shop!! So many to sample and no idea which I like best. The "live" versions are excellent though as I can play with them without having to install anything. What a great idea.

    Anyway, I've taken up enough bandwidth, so I'll shut up for now.

    To all the Windows users out there....Linux IS better in a lot of ways, but maybe doesn't feel like it at first. Take more time than I did to learn and play around before flaming or giving up. I'm so glad I did. Try a few different distributions of Linux before deciding you don't like it as they really are very different.

    Thanks for all your help and encouragement once again guys, it's been much appreciated.

    Lealoc

  7. #17
    Trusted Penguin Dapper Dan's Avatar
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    Great to hear everything is going well Lealoc! You'll be interested to have a look at my new signature. I have you to thank for it.
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  8. #18
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    Yea great to hear the skies are clearing =) Keep with it and have fun!
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  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dapper Dan
    All this is so much more difficult for you because of your IT background in Windows. I've seen this several times before. As you admit, you are trying to solve Linux problems with your Windows procedures and experiences. Intuitively you know this simply will not work. I will admit that Linux can be very frustrating at times after first switching over, but honestly I can't say I had any more frustration changing to Linux than I had while trying to learn Windows initially. You CAN listen to mp3's, watch commercial DVD's and use an external storage device in Linux as many users here do. Most here would have been happy to provide you with assistance had you only asked. You would have received helpful and easy to follow directions. The reason there is no native mp3 or DVD support with Linux is because of software patents but you can get these things running. On your external storage device, it sounds like you are trying to create a folder as regular user and not root user which is a security measure to protect your files. Initiate the konqueror file browser in your "media" directory as root by opening a terminal. "Konsole" from your menu will do. Then type:

    Code:
    kdesu konqueror /media
    You will be asked for root password. Enter it and press enter. Once konqueror is up and running, see in your /media folder if you can see your external storage device. Click on it to enter. Is this storage device formatted in fat32? If so, you should then be able to create a folder. If the device is formatted with ntfs, the difficulty you've been having has just done you a great service. It is dangerous to write to ntfs formatted devices from Linux. The result can be a catastrophic loss of data. I presume it is fat32 though.

    If you want assistance with these problems, I and many other here will gladly assist you in getting things going and it won't take fifteen hours of your time. You CAN learn Linux if you want, but of course the choice is yours.

    I do have to say that Linux does not perform as quick to the eye as Xp pro does. i have everything installed. I will get the internet connected it is just a matter of time. However, I am not saying it is bad at all. however, there are crashes. The only thing that worries me is, is it true that updates are only for a year and then you have to pay for the next update? If this is so, it could cost more for Linux than Windows.

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by mrpsychology
    The only thing that worries me is, is it true that updates are only for a year and then you have to pay for the next update? If this is so, it could cost more for Linux than Windows.
    Where did you hear this? This is totally untrue.
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