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Yeah, I recognize a whole lot of that, but you left out one very important detail. Take for example when I go through the manpage for flock(2), I might see ...
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  1. #21
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    Yeah, I recognize a whole lot of that, but you left out one very important detail. Take for example when I go through the manpage for flock(2), I might see a note about fcntl(2) file locking, and I say to myself: "Hmmm... that seems interesting... it supports NFS file locking and all kinds of stuff". Then I look up fcntl(2), and find out, not only about fcntl record locking, but also about directory notification and file leasing. So I say to myself again: "Hmmm... I wonder if it is directory notification that nautilus uses to update the directory contents in that nifty way", and then I look that up, and find out the nautilus really uses sgi_fam instead, and I remember that, because who knows when that might become useful? I also wonder how that file leasing thing might be implemented in the kernel, and when I check that out, I find a comment in the source about an algorithm borrowed from, say, the Random Early Drop packet scheduler, and I think, "Hmmm... that packet scheduling thing seems interesting enough", and so it goes forever on. The bad part is, of course, that it strangely takes so long to complete the original project... =)

    Of course, the best way to find something is just that you would really like some kind of functionality. Recently, I wrote support for displaying caller ID through the computer. Not only did I write the script that looks up name information from phone number and says it via speech synthesis in Perl, which I just recently began to explore, but I also learned a lot more about the termios(3) interface while writing the daemon that listens to the modem.
    I also completed a segmented download manager for my own Direct Connect implementation today, and as some might recall, I had a little discussion here about the mechanism of mmap(2). That was really related to the IPC I used in that project.

    Which makes me think of something else. Many times in this forum you hear things like "I just replaced my old Mandrake 7 with RedHat 8, and...", which is something I cannot understand. Do really so few people customize their systems so much that you'd never want to replace them? The customizability is one of the things I like most with Linux (and UNIX in general). I'm really getting the feeling that all too few know about the true strengths of using Linux instead of Windows, which is really a pity.

  2. #22
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    Sometimes I will redo users and such, just because somewhere along the way I know some miscellaneous cruft will make it's way into my home directory. All the sudden I have stuff from nautilus from like 9 months ago. It isn't 1/100th as bad as Windows' whole "lets just keep ****ing with the registry till it is unbearable" type thing though. Plus as a regular user you could install crap in the system directory that didn't need to be there, and there was no real way to tell what every file belonged to, so there was no hope of cleaning Windows up. Blah, enough of my whining for now.
    I respectfully decline the invitation to join your delusion.

  3. #23
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    revisiting this old problem

    Well, I've just realized that this emacs problem is defintely a font problem. Whenever I use a fixed font in my .Xdefaults file, everything is fine. It's just when I use any other fonts besides the fixed one and this disaster strikes. The picture is located at http://rplaca.cs.qc.edu/~bpark/weird.jpg.
    Would my window manager be responsible for this problem at all? I was reading some docs and it said that it's best to state the actual font name as opposed to the font alias because different window managers will behave differently to fonts. This problem is fixed whenever I logout and log back in. But again, once I run a Java GUI application, this happens again.
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  4. #24
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    One thing is certain; it's not a problem with the window manager. The window manager basically just handles the outlines of a window, not anything in its client area.
    But how exactly do you mean? If you use a fixed font, does it still work even when you run a Java GUI application?
    I am beginning to suspect that this might be a bug in the font that you're trying to use.

  5. #25
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    window manager

    Dolda,

    Well, the reason why I was suspecting the window manager was because the problem is solved when I log out and log back in. However, once I start another Java GUI application, then the problem comes about again. I tested this in twm and and KDE so like you said, it definetly is NOT the window manager.
    The font itself might be a problem. I use .Xdefaults to customize the emacs fonts and background and all that good stuff. So if I use something like "emacs*font: fixed", this problem doens't happen at all. The font that I AM using as of now is lucidasanstypewriter-12, which is really just "-b&h-lucidasanstypewriter-medium-r-normal-sans-12-120-75-75-m-70-iso8859-1".
    It almost seems as if this is the only font that is giving me trouble.
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  6. #26
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    What version of XF86 do you run?

  7. #27
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    4.1.0-16
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  8. #28
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    The only way I am able to see it, this is either a bug in X; in that case, it might help upgrading to 4.3, or it is a bug in emacs. Are you sure that emacs is able to run with this font on other installations? Maybe it's just supposed to run with the fixed font?

  9. #29
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    don't think it's an X problem

    I don't think it's an X problem since I've tried upgrading that and nothing was different. However, I once upgraded to emacs21 but I really hate how things in emacs21 works so I went back to emacs20.
    Where would I find information regarding what fonts I can and cannot use regarding this emacs. I'm running this same font on konsole, kate, and other applications in which none of them have any errors.
    The best things in life are free.

  10. #30
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    I've tried every font in the xfonts-alias file. It seems like the only one that is error prone is this current one that I'm using which is lucidasanstypewriter(any size).
    The best things in life are free.

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