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  1. #1
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    Gnome or KDE


    What is the difference between Gnome and KDE?

  2. #2
    Linux Guru Cabhan's Avatar
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    Hrm. Interesting.

    Well, both are desktop environments. What this means is that each contains a window manager (the application that controls your windows, properly displays them, etc.), they each contain numerous applications for all sorts of things, and they therefore provide a graphical interface for Linux.

    Each of these DE's (Desktop Environments) provides applications such as a control center, web browser (Konqueror for KDE, Nautilus for Gnome), mail program (KMail / Evolution), text editors (Kate / gedit), music players (amaroK / Totem), and other such things. It should be noted that these applications can all be used in the other DE (though it may require you to install both DE's), and tons of applications based on neither of them are available (Firefox, Thunderbird, vim, XMMS, etc.).

    KDE was around first. It is based primarily on the Qt widget set, which was originally a proprietary set (the modern UNIX Qt set is available under the GPL). For me, KDE has always seemed more of a full-featured DE than Gnome, in that it provides a fairly comprehensive control center, and is fairly customizable.

    Gnome was created due to concerns about the Qt's original proprietary nature. It uses the Gtk+ widget toolkit, which is licensed under the LGPL, and basically originally was FOSS's response to KDE (though the point is now moot). I have always seen Gnome as somewhat more barebones (though still having many features), but also less customizable.

    It should be pointed out that I personally used KDE (I now use neither), and I have FAR more experience with it than with Gnome, so my analysis is not entirely neutral.

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    if you use neither what do you use? command line

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    Linux Guru techieMoe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by vbabiy
    if you use neither what do you use? command line
    KDE and Gnome are Desktop Environments, which are different from Window Managers. DE's have an integrated set of programs including a Window Manager, File Manager, usually some sort of productivity apps (such as KOffice and Kopete), a Desktop Manager, a Task Bar, etc.

    Window Managers are mostly just a way to provide a GUI. Some include desktops, some include file managers, but all at least offer some way to draw windows on the desktop. There are hundreds of Window Managers out there for various tastes. Some are made for speed (Blackbox, Fluxbox, IceWM, Ion), others are built for customization (Enlightenment). If someone isn't using KDE or Gnome, they might be using one of these or just the command-line.
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    It should be pointed out that there are more then just 2 desktop enviorments. It did not seem like the topic starter knows that.

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    Linux Guru Cabhan's Avatar
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    While there are more than just KDE and Gnome (CDE was one of the original ones, and Enlightenment 17 is gunning to be a DE as well), KDE and Gnome are the main ones, and if you're new to Linux, I highly recommend choosing one of those, at least until you get your bearings. At which time, you should go and try everything.

    Right: I use Fluxbox, which is simply a window manager: it doesn't come with a control center, bundled apps, or anything fancy like that. Rather, it simply lets me work.

    If this is more of a question about which one to use, I'd recommend trying both out. Ubuntu is a Linux distro popular for new users, and they offer LiveCD's with both a Gnome and KDE DE, unfortunately on different CDs.

    Gnome:
    http://www.ubuntu.com/download

    KDE:
    http://www.kubuntu.org/download.php

    Download a Desktop CD ISO of each, burn 'em to CDs, and you can see both in action and judge for yourself.

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    Don't forget XFCE; it's a pretty good DE solution for those with tendencies to lightweight software (like myself). Ubuntu also has a live CD with XFCE on it called Xubuntu.
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    Yeah i am very new to linux(less then a week since started) i am just playing around with linux. i have fedora core 5 installed right now and playing with that but i just had a little held back because i haven't been able to get my blue tooth mouse to work... but i am going to try to mess around with blueZ to day after work hopefully that fix my problem. I am also starting a class on from school so hopefully after words i can get my Comtia Linux+ cert... well that all in the future would like to see how it all trues out.

    But my ultimate goal is to be able to let go of windows for good... and switch compelete over to Linux. most of the software i use is available for linux the most important being Zend Stuido IDE for my php web developing.

    while i am at it i was wondering if there are any open source project developing software like adobe photoshop and such?

    and thank for all the help i have got from this community so far its been great i have learned alot about linux in the past week and hoping to learn much more in the near future.

  10. #9
    Linux Guru techieMoe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by vbabiy
    while i am at it i was wondering if there are any open source project developing software like adobe photoshop and such?
    Here's a list of analogs for Windows/Linux apps:
    http://www.linuxrsp.ru/win-lin-soft/table-eng.html

    Not everything is a 100% replacement. I for instance like the way Photoshop behaves, and although the GIMP offers 90% of the features that Photoshop has, it just doesn't *act* the way I expect it to (i.e. like Photoshop). I just can't get into the interface because I'm used to the way Photoshop works. You might find the transition easier though. Give it a shot. GIMP comes with most distributions.
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    WOW that list deffently got me conviced on LINUX i never knew there was so much out there for linux i just can wait to get a hang of using the OS and then bye bye WINDOWS

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