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Nothing wrong with the distros everyone has mentioned, but I like to advocate Knoppix for installing to your hd. It auto-detects your hardware very well (as well as SuSE) and ...
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  1. #11
    Linux Guru fingal's Avatar
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    Nothing wrong with the distros everyone has mentioned, but I like to advocate Knoppix for installing to your hd. It auto-detects your hardware very well (as well as SuSE) and although it isn't what people call a 'full distro' it's up there with the rest. Also Debian based, so it's quite easy to install new binary packages.

    Of course, you don't need to install it, you can just boot it straight from a CD and check it out, then carry on using whatever you like
    I am always doing that which I can not do, in order that I may learn how to do it. - Pablo Picasso

  2. #12
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    Re: Which Distro is right for me?

    Quote Originally Posted by Chaotic_Amber
    Ok, i've posted here a handfull of times, read several tutorials here and at other sites and I am just not as happy with RH9 as I thought I would be.

    "On Windows I can find a new program or game online, download it, double click the file and the installation will practially happen without me. Now on RH I am still (after about 6 months) struggling and cursing every time I see a .tar.gx file that I have to download. No matter how many tutorials I read then attempt to follow I cannot seem to get them to work for me.

    "I do not want to have to piece together a new program from its compnents so that it will work. I'm not a stupid man by any means but I don't want to have to learn how to write to a root file just to get my PC to boot up with my CD-Rom already mounted. I sort of figure that should be a pre-requisite for an operating system.
    That could have been me writing. I too am new to Linux and went for RH9 as it was a free download. My computing experience goes back to the days of DOS so I am not afraid of the command line but I still cannot get my head around Linux.
    I tried to download and instal Acrobat to view a pdf file (for some reason the built in viewer would not!). I unpacked it and ran the script but to this day I have no idea where the files are or how to start the program. With DOS or Windows you found the com or exe file and away you went, with Linux?
    I have read numerous on-line tutorials and downloaded a great number of documents and I bought the book 'Beginning Red Hat Linux 9' but to no avail.
    Personally I feel that Linux will never gain a mass market share until it gets as easy as Windows to use. I know the experienced Linux users will say that they do not want this, so perhaps it is time they stopped trying to tell us it is an alternative to Windows and admitted the truth that it is in fact a very powerful OS that is best suited to specialist users.
    I will continue to 'play' with Linux but Windows will be my OS for use.

  3. #13
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    Ease of use

    Personally I feel that Linux will never gain a mass market share until it gets as easy as Windows to use. I know the experienced Linux users will say that they do not want this, so perhaps it is time they stopped trying to tell us it is an alternative to Windows and admitted the truth that it is in fact a very powerful OS that is best suited to specialist users.
    I will continue to 'play' with Linux but Windows will be my OS for use.
    Linux is getting easier to use, but it is taking a long time as people who program the packages for it are experts, and know what they are doing, people new to the os struggle to learn the basics, but it is very good once you do. Any program you install should be able to run from the terminal, much as windows 3.11 had command for everything. It has eveolved with billions of dollars, but soon i can see at least 1 version of linux doing that. Once 1 does, i can see other following, and giving people options of how to run it, but i see that as a long way off yet. Linux is getting bigger, but just needs to be more accepted by companies not individuals.

    Sorry for my ranting
    Very funny scotty - now beam down my clothes

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  5. #14
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    Don't get me wrong I think Linux is a very good OS but I can only comment on my experience with it.
    Personally I have found RH9 to be very slow on a laptop that was running Windows XP quite happily.
    I cannot get my head around the file system. With Windows there is a folder called 'Program Files' where the majority of programs install their files in an apropriately named folder. Take Acrobat for example on my Windows machines it is in C:\Program Files\Adobe\Acrobat 6.0\Reader and in that folder there is a file called AcroRd32.exe which I can work out is the executable for the program.
    But when I tried to install it under Linux I think some of it ended up in usr/bin/etc but I am not sure as there was no icon created to indicate the executable.
    I am lead to believe that programs are run from script files but running what appeared to be the script for Acrobat did nothing. I tied to get the program to run but after a number of days of experimenting I gave up - to be honest I have not switched the machine on for a couple of weeks.
    I might take a look at Mandrake as I understand it is easier to use than Red Hat - also a free download.

    That's my ranting over

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