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Is someone interested in creating or has a cmd line cheat sheet for most linux systems please post or give url? i.e rm -rf for deleting directories with stuff in ...
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  1. #1
    flw
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    cmd line cheat sheet ?


    Is someone interested in creating or has a cmd line cheat sheet for most linux systems please post or give url? i.e rm -rf for deleting directories with stuff in it or top -c for cpu % usage, cmd's for start/stopping services, vi basics, emacs basics, disk usages via du, config files etc...

    Services (like apache, samba or qmail,) or programming/scripting (like cgi, java, php, perl or c) would not be included due to size. Just Linux cheat sheet for cmd line.

    I don't have a cheat sheet list of these and have to look them up everytime because I don't have them memorized and I don't use them regularly. My Linux boxes are at work only.

    Thanks
    Dan

    \"Keep your friends close and your enemies even closer\" from The Art of War by Sun Tzu\"

  2. #2
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    Emacs is pretty simple for basic functionality.

    To run it, run: emacs <filename>

    Save is CTRL-X and then CTRL-S.

    To quit, do "F10", then "f" then "e".

    Not used Vi much. I thing ZZ is save and exit? and vi <filename> to open the file in the first place.


    Does anyone have links for basic comand line reference or Vi?

  3. #3
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    I've just done a search on "unix cheatsheets" on Google and this was one of the replies

    http://www.rain.org/~mkummel/unix.html

    Have a look its good as far as it goes. If basic unix commands and reminders as to what they do is what you are looking for then it may just fit the bill.

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  5. #4
    flw
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    It seems like a good start but incomplete. Like how to use the correct syntax for rpm, tar, du, df, top, touch, etc... From a user and admin (local only) perspective you would need to know these and others to master the local machine. i.e if user see things are running slow he would need to be able to run a top-c for cpu usage, du for disk usage (or full) let alone install a rpm service or patch etc...
    Dan

    \"Keep your friends close and your enemies even closer\" from The Art of War by Sun Tzu\"

  6. #5
    flw
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    I have put together a cmd line guide for non-programmer Linux users. I would like any feed back on:

    1. Anything that is wrong and what it should be.

    2. Anything cmd line stuff a non-programmer linux user should know for his own good in understanding what is going on and how to start the troublshooting process.

    This was put together from many sources in the past couple years, I just never glued them together. I'll just edit this post with any corrections or additions due to additional threads.


    Admin Notice:
    This document has been added to our tutorials section, to view the most recent copy, please follow this link: http://www.this_site_does_not_exist/viewtopic.php?t=75
    Dan

    \"Keep your friends close and your enemies even closer\" from The Art of War by Sun Tzu\"

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    fastlanwan - I like that most basic of guides you made. I c/p'ed it locally.
    It's a great start for those like me.

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    Thanks flw
    It's great.

  9. #8
    flw
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    Thanks, I've been adding to the list as I find cmd's that a new user may need depending on how they use linux.

    It is not intended to be a all inclusive list, but a list that covers a working level knowledge without having to know every switch for each cmd or even every cmd. Some cmd's are just not basic in nature for a new user.

    If anyone has a command that they feel a new user may need to use please add to this post or pm me. Include the cmd, a working example and why it may be needed.

    Maybe someone can put someting like this together on one or more of the gui's for new users? KDE, Gnome, etc... Another idea is tips to add hardware or tips in getting hardware to work when the install didn't.

    This board will become what you make it. Thanks again,
    Dan

    \"Keep your friends close and your enemies even closer\" from The Art of War by Sun Tzu\"

  10. #9
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    In my search for newbie help I ran across an awesome (IMHO) resource with a real nice command line section. Linux cookbook is definitely in my favorites and being leeched a sectionat a time to make my own personal guide.

    Main page is at

    http://tldp.org/LDP/linuxcookbook/ht...kbook_toc.html

    Command Line section is at

    http://tldp.org/LDP/linuxcookbook/ht...44.html#SEC585

    You can download the entire document at

    http://tldp.org/LDP/linuxcookbook/

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