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Hallo, if someone is new to linux I usually recommend to start GParted. This program is very simple to use. It isn't only possible to partitionate and formatate you can ...
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  1. #11
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    Hallo,
    if someone is new to linux I usually recommend to start GParted.
    This program is very simple to use.
    It isn't only possible to partitionate and formatate you can also just see which distributions you have, how they are formatated and how much unused space they have.
    (After saving your data) you can with GParted also reduce partitions to create others.

    There are a view thing you should know when you work with linux.
    You may not have more than 4 primary partitions per HDD.
    Usually the first (which is also bootpartition) is used for Windows if you want multiboot solution.
    In the second Primary (which works as an extended Partition) there will be implemented the virtual Partitions (for data and/or linuxes)
    the third Primary is used for Linux-Swap
    The fourth Primary is traditionally kept free for Solaris.

    Linux counts hda1 to hda4 for the Primaries and starts with hda5 for the virtual Partitions.
    So often you don't have a hda4 even if you have hda5 and hda6.


    Linux doesn't have problems with FAT and NTFS but Windows does have problems with ext3 and so on.
    That's way a datapartition should be ntfs so you have access from both OSs.

    If you know this you will see GParted is a full graphical program very simple to use.


    But whenever you don't understand something with linux please feel free to ask - therefor there is the forum.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by devils casper View Post
    Most of distros should work fine on your machine.

    Why installation of those distros was not successful? Could you post any error message?
    I'll partition today and attempt to install a popular linux. I think I may just pinpoint the problem today. Ill post any errors.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by emerset View Post
    I'll partition today and attempt to install a popular linux. I think I may just pinpoint the problem today. Ill post any errors.
    I can reccomend for beginners, beside others Mandriva, OpenMamba, Sabayon, Mint,. ..
    Maybe this helps you to select (there are 100s of distributions)

  4. $spacer_open
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  5. #14
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    I partitioned with GParted. I now have four Partitions:

    Partition File System Size
    /dev/sda1 linux-swap 509.84 MiB boot
    /dev/sda2 reiserfs 17.08 GiB
    /dev/sda3 reiserfs 19.99 GiB
    /dev/sda4 reiserfs 111.48 GiB


    I intend to keep number 1 for whatever it is for. it seems I cant touch it, and it seems pretty mandatory.
    I intend to keep number 2 for the programs I will install in this distro while I fiddle around with installing another distro.
    3 will be for trying to install the other distro.
    4 will be for data such as movies music photos and books

    now Im downloading Monty Python movies and currently theyre all being addes to my sda2. I cant seem to find sda4 and i dont know how to add data to it. All the partitions are Primary (not Extended) and I chose reiserfs File System just to follow the leader (Sda2) Was I wrong to do that?
    All the best.

  6. #15
    Super Moderator devils casper's Avatar
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    reiserfs is good filesystem but to save data in /dev/sda4, you have to mount it and allow regular users to access it.

    Create a mount_point ( folder ) for /dev/sda4.
    Code:
    sudo mkdir /media/data
    Add this code in /etc/fstab file :
    Code:
    /dev/sda4    /media/data    reiserfs     defaults    0   0
    Save file and reboot machine.
    Now open Terminal and execute this
    Code:
    id
    Note down user and group ids. Execute this
    Code:
    sudo chown -R  user_id:group_id /media/data
    Thats all. Your /dev/sda4 partition will be mounted at /media/data and you will have full permission to read/write in there.

    In case you face any problem, post the contents of /etc/fstab file and output of id command here.
    It is amazing what you can accomplish if you do not care who gets the credit.
    New Users: Read This First

  7. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by emerset View Post
    I partitioned with GParted. I now have four Partitions:

    Partition File System Size
    /dev/sda1 linux-swap 509.84 MiB boot
    /dev/sda2 reiserfs 17.08 GiB
    /dev/sda3 reiserfs 19.99 GiB
    /dev/sda4 reiserfs 111.48 GiB


    I intend to keep number 1 for whatever it is for. it seems I cant touch it, and it seems pretty mandatory.
    I intend to keep number 2 for the programs I will install in this distro while I fiddle around with installing another distro.
    3 will be for trying to install the other distro.
    4 will be for data such as movies music photos and books

    now Im downloading Monty Python movies and currently theyre all being addes to my sda2. I cant seem to find sda4 and i don't know how to add data to it. All the partitions are Primary (not Extended) and I chose reiserfs File System just to follow the leader (Sda2) Was I wrong to do that?
    All the best.
    Honestly I don't know I never tried with the swap-Partition as sda1.
    Also I never heard about Swap-Partition as a boot-Partition.
    So I don't know if it will work.

    Also as you have 4 Primary Partitions you can't add another partition later on for the case you suddenly see you'd need another partition.

    I also learned best for swap would be twice the RAM as size - I intend that much doesn't make really sense but I'd have chosen 1GB. You'd have decided for GB.

    So the situation is one, that strange for me that I can't help you with further difficulties. Please if they come up ask more experienced members in the forum

  8. #17
    Super Moderator devils casper's Avatar
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    I agree with computerophil regarding SWAP partition. Your first partition is not /boot. Location of SWAP partition doesn't matter much.
    Could you post the output of free and fdisk -l commands here?
    It is amazing what you can accomplish if you do not care who gets the credit.
    New Users: Read This First

  9. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by devils casper View Post
    I agree with computerophil regarding SWAP partition. Your first partition is not /boot. Location of SWAP partition doesn't matter much.
    Could you post the output of free and fdisk -l commands here?
    Took me forever to find out why "fdisk -l" didnt work. Ive been through two linux tutorials and now know lots more. I realized I had to be in root user just now and so here is the output.

    # fdisk -l

    Disk /dev/hdc: 160.0 GB, 160041885696 bytes
    255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 19457 cylinders
    Units = cilindros of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
    Disk identifier: 0x3c229592

    Dispositivo_Boot___Start________End_______Blocks__ _Id__System
    /dev/hdc1----*-----------1--------------65-----------522081-----82--Linux swap / Solaris
    /dev/hdc2---------------66----------2295--------17912475-----83--Linux
    /dev/hdc3----------16849---------19457--------20956792+---83--Linux
    /dev/hdc4------------2296---------16848------116896972+---83--Linux

    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    # free
    ____________total_______used______free____shared__ __buffers____cached
    Mem:------3091144-------2961600-----129544-------------0-------76668-----2591020
    -/+ buffers/cache:----------293912----2797232
    Swap:-------522072------------260------521812


    my distro is a get-with-your-laptop outdated thing in portuguese called fenix, I dislike it extensively, and am trying to change it and learn everything there is to know at the same time. first step i think is organizing HDD

  10. #19
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    Is anything really awful, cuz I could restart everything, I have nothing of particular value in my HDD.

  11. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by emerset View Post
    Is anything really awful, cuz I could restart everything, I have nothing of particular value in my HDD.
    If you plan to do so I'd choose the pragmatic way:
    this means for Linux solo.

    Partition File System Size
    /dev/sda1 Linux-Partition 15GiB ext3 boot (primary)
    /dev/sda2 extended Partition 142GiB (primary)
    /dev/sda5,sda6,.. Data-Partitions and/or further Linux-Partitions (logical)
    /dev/sda3 linux-swap 1-2 GiB (primary)

    or multiboot with windows
    Partition File System Size
    /dev/sda1 Windows-Partition 25GiB ntfs boot (primary)
    /dev/sda2 extended Partition 142GiB (primary)
    /dev/sda5 Data-Partition ntfs (so Windows and Linuxhave access) (logical)
    /dev/sda6 first Linux-Partition 15GiB ext3 (logical)
    /dev/sda7, sda8,.. Data-Partitions and/or further Linux-Partitions (logical)
    /dev/sda3 linux-swap 1-2 GiB (primary)

    ---------------------------------
    PS: as you said you use "fenix" - are you brasilian?
    Here it isn't really known (nothing at distroWatch and it seems portuguese only (nothing multilingual)

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