Find the answer to your Linux question:
Results 1 to 7 of 7
I have a Seagate Mirra network storage device which is really a small PC running linux with a propriatary client that runs on Windows machines to provide both backup and ...
Enjoy an ad free experience by logging in. Not a member yet? Register.
  1. #1
    Just Joined! paulkruger's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    NE Florida
    Posts
    22

    Post NAS Storage. How to add FTP support


    I have a Seagate Mirra network storage device which is really a small PC running linux with a propriatary client that runs on Windows machines to provide both backup and web based access to files on the server over the internet. When I try to access it via the IP it appears to also be running Jetty.

    Here's the thing. There is no linux client to use with this box but as of now I really don't want to destroy the setup such that the windows backup won't work from other machines.

    Can someone give me a few pointers on setting up FTP on this box that will accept connections from backup software running on Linux, or on a way to mount that drive so I can backup to it from Linux boxes without needing the client software?

    I don't know what distro is used but by connecting a keyboard, mouse and monitor I can probably watch it boot and find out. There is no GUI that I can see. There is no CD but I can plug in an external CD via USB. The box has video, audio, PS/2 and USB ports as well as parallel and serial ports.

    Any thoughts welcome.:

    I have a URL to more info but the board won't allow me to post it so you will need to Google it for additional data.

  2. #2
    Linux Engineer Segfault's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Acadiana
    Posts
    877
    Are you sure it does not have NFS support already?

  3. #3
    Just Joined! paulkruger's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    NE Florida
    Posts
    22
    Quote Originally Posted by Segfault View Post
    Are you sure it does not have NFS support already?

    I am sure of nothing... How would I even tell this?

    I have other linux boxes on the network but being new to linux I don't even know how to access or mount these other devices over the network like I do with Windows.

    I know that their server on the internet can connect to my box and that I can access files remotely via their web server. But I don't know if this is using anything standard or something proprietary.

    This is one of the reasons for my post, hoping to find someone who knows about this stuff ! Perhaps someone who has already "been there, done that" with regards to this box. I am sure I am not the first person so hoped to find someone with additional information or who has done that!

  4. #4
    Linux Guru
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    1,755
    There is this great thing called a "manual."

  5. #5
    Just Joined! paulkruger's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    NE Florida
    Posts
    22
    Quote Originally Posted by HROAdmin26 View Post
    There is this great thing called a manual."
    I have that manual but it does not address the topic of this thread in any way.

  6. #6
    Linux Guru
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    1,755
    So you make a post saying you are clueless, don't know where to start, etc. and don't fully explain *what you've already done.* Don't you think that would be important information?

    So after reading through the manual, and then Googling, I can see several things:

    A) These things are old. The models I saw are small, normal PC's with VIA processors and 64MB RAM. (Maybe there are updated models with newer specs.)

    B) There is very little "hacking a mirra" information. There is a video on YouTube of one booting. Once booted, the keyboard does not accept input. Because of the keyboard disable + BIOS password, this page outlines the process used to reflash the BIOS, wipe the HDD, and load another OS (Windows in this case - screenshot.)

    Based on that info and other Googling, it appears that the Linux install + "sharing application" are highly proprietary.

    All of this combines to mean: Modifying the existing OS will be *difficult* because you can't login to the console and don't have SSH access. Getting that access seems to at least require reflashing the BIOS. Once you get into this custom "Linux" kernel, you will likely not find prebuilt packages for what you want to install (FTP server, NFS server, etc.) So that would mean compiling from source, and then you will need a build environment for the running kernel - again, probably a challenge.

    The "quick" method to make this a general-usage device appears to be to un-Mirra it and install a friendlier OS.

    Barring that, you could always use a staging area on a Windows machine. Linux => Windows => Mirra

  7. #7
    Linux Engineer Segfault's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Acadiana
    Posts
    877
    showmount -e <IP address or a valid node name>

    This will tell you if your server is exporting any shares over NFS.

    Edit: Just saw HROAdmin26 post. I'd say your best option is to un-Mirra it.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •