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Hey everyone... I understand that all linux distributions shares the same kernel and file systems... So is there a way to migrate from one distribution to another (e.g. Ubuntu to ...
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  1. #1
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    migration between distributions...


    Hey everyone...

    I understand that all linux distributions shares the same kernel and file systems...
    So is there a way to migrate from one distribution to another (e.g. Ubuntu to OpenSUSE) without losing any of my files or software that are already installed and stored in the hard desk ???



    Regards

  2. #2
    Linux Guru reed9's Avatar
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    Yes, if you created a separate /home partition when you installed, it's quite easy. When you reinstall a new distro, you can choose to mount the same partition as home without formatting it.

    But if you're asking if you can simply replace the Ubuntu system files and kernel and such with OpenSuse files, then no, it doesn't quite work like that.

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    oz
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    Quote Originally Posted by Big-Boss View Post
    Hey everyone...

    I understand that all linux distributions shares the same kernel and file systems...
    So is there a way to migrate from one distribution to another (e.g. Ubuntu to OpenSUSE) without losing any of my files or software that are already installed and stored in the hard desk ???



    Regards
    Welcome to the forums!

    You'll need to backup any important data, then do a fresh install if you want to fully migrate to a different distribution. You can restore your data to the new system after it's installed.
    oz

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    Thanks guys for your help...

    I think I'm gonna backup the important data for full migration...



    Regards

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    Quote Originally Posted by Big-Boss View Post
    Thanks guys for your help...

    I think I'm gonna backup the important data for full migration...



    Regards
    Other way if you have the space:

    Consider parallel install of the other distro on its own partitions, then copy what you want over and then delete the old partitions.

  6. #6
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    Migrat5ing to a new distro...

    Quote Originally Posted by heismark View Post
    Other way if you have the space:

    Consider parallel install of the other distro on its own partitions, then copy what you want over and then delete the old partitions.

    Yep. Good idea. I prefer to this same thing with a $9 pen drive. I can toss it in a box and have it forever.

    Hope this helps!

    Steve

  7. #7
    Linux Engineer hazel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Big-Boss View Post
    I understand that all linux distributions shares the same kernel and file systems...
    So is there a way to migrate from one distribution to another (e.g. Ubuntu to OpenSUSE) without losing any of my files or software that are already installed and stored in the hard desk ???
    The reason that doesn't usually work is that Linux programs mostly rely on pre-existing external libraries. On Windows, programs come with their own libraries, eating up your disk space and constantly reinventing the same old bugs. In Linux, once there is a stable, well-debugged library to do a particular job, most new programs will use it. But each distro has a different pattern of release versions of these libraries, and its programs are compiled against the versions that it uses. So they generally won't work in another distro.

    Of course that doesn't apply to data files.
    "I'm just a little old lady; don't try to dazzle me with jargon!"

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    Although linux distros have a lot in common with each other, each distro does things slightly differently and adds value to the distro by the 'extras' and admin tools they offer.
    This means that you have a choice of distro.
    Yes the kernel is common to all distros (although some use older versions than others) and nothing stops you from reading up and installing your own kernel on whatever distro you use. But that is where the similarity ends.
    For future installs, make sure you have a separate /home partition for all your data. All distros will use this and you won't lose data when you update or do a new install.
    This will also allow you to install and multiboot several distros, depending on how much disc space you have.
    Generally, around 8GB is enough for the / or root partition.

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