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Hi, I normally use opensuse 11.2 but my laptop is drying out after a wine-astrophe. bless my visiting father for that one. wanted a netbook anyway, and have linpus lite ...
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  1. #1
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    Cool stupid linpus file permissions, no password?


    Hi,

    I normally use opensuse 11.2 but my laptop is drying out after a wine-astrophe. bless my visiting father for that one. wanted a netbook anyway, and have linpus lite on it. it sucks, i want eebuntu. alas linpus thinks my eebuntu iso is not to be extracted, copied, touched. it doesn't think my external dvd drive exists, and wouldn't allow it to be burnt anyway. i can't log in as root, no password. anywhere. the whole folder and contents are all set to read and write.

    so the questions are 1: what is the standard su and user passwords for acer aspire one on linpus?
    2: how do you force mount a cd drive on the command line?
    3: how do i change permissions on the command line?

    Thanks for your time, linux is, as ever, a learning curve!

  2. #2
    Linux Guru reed9's Avatar
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    1. The user password you should have setup on the first boot. Possibly the root too, not sure.

    Assuming you know your user password, you can open a terminal and do
    Code:
    sudo su -
    passwd
    But then, you'd already be logged in as root to be able to change the root password in this way.

    2. You don't mount the CD drive, you mount filesystems. If a CD in the drive has a filesystem on it, it can be mounted.

    With the USB CD drive connected, post the output of the following:

    Code:
    lsusb
    wodim --devices
    wodim -scanbus
    (I'm assuming and maybe I'm wrong, that Linpus comes with cdrkit installed? Or possibly has the original cdrtools?)

    3. chmod command

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    Hey, thanks for the reply!

    I put a blank cd in the drive earlier and it locked the whole system, had to hold the power button to turn off. yay. Linpus must die.

    found out that the password for linpus lite is 111111 for root (six 1's incase you just see a load of 1's like me....!) if it's put in by default. Ironically found it while looking for something else! Thankyou for telling me how to change the root password, worked without a hitch.

    Enabling the right click menu (xfce-setting-show in terminal) gave me all the options i was missing, yay! but no k9copy, which i can't live without.

    still working on getting the dvd drive to take a blank disk, have installed k3b, so with a bit of luck can get the iso into a workable format. this stupid xarchiver won't let me extract the files. will let me open individual files, but not extract any.

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    Quote Originally Posted by fallenstar View Post

    I put a blank cd in the drive earlier and it locked the whole system, had to hold the power button to turn off. yay. Linpus must die.
    Did manage to get it to take a disk later and it was fine and happy, just not blank dvd's?

  6. #5
    Linux Guru reed9's Avatar
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    still working on getting the dvd drive to take a blank disk, have installed k3b, so with a bit of luck can get the iso into a workable format. this stupid xarchiver won't let me extract the files. will let me open individual files, but not extract any.
    I'm rather confused what you're trying to do here. I thought you just wanted to burn an iso to disc, so you can install a eeebuntu?

    If you have a USB flash drive, it would probably be easier to install eeebuntu to that, instead of burning a disc.

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    Rather use the dd command to copy the eebuntu iso top a usb stick. (I seem to remember there is a section on this on the eeebuntu forum). Then set the bios to boot from the stick.
    1. Download the iso,
    2. Place the stick in the pc
    3. Open a terminal
    4. In a terminal, as root type /sbin/fdisk and note the mount for the usb drive (usually /dev/sdb)
    5 Unmount the usb drive (umount /dev/sdb)
    6. Type
    dd if=eebuntu.iso of=/dev/sdb1

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    Quote Originally Posted by whych View Post
    6. Type
    dd if=eebuntu.iso of=/dev/sdb1
    I haven't use the dd command before, but I think this will overwrite everything on the USB stick. If you want to keep anything on the stick you should probably copy it somewhere else first. (Waiting for the backup-bashers to bash me because of course - you already have a backup )

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    Sorry, should have told him this.

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    right, sorry my internet went down for a change!

    I was babbling and non-specific... Ok, ideal is to retain linpus if i can make it do as i want. that is not going to happen as k9copy is not available for it, but it now appears to not be available for eeebuntu, so i'm going to fedora 12 instead.

    The dvd drive wouldn't take a blank disk until i put k3b on it, now works like a dream. That was after enabling the right click menu.

    I'm very happy that you showed me how to make a boot usb key, i thought the only way was to download software not available for linpus.

    Thanks for all your help, I'm all sorted now.

    xxxx

  11. #10
    Linux Guru reed9's Avatar
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    dd if=eebuntu.iso of=/dev/sdb1
    This won't necessarily make it bootable, unless the iso is built to do so. Sometimes distro release an .img file specifically meant for USB drives, or sometimes they have hybrid iso files which can be either burnt to disc or used from a USB flash drive.

    Otherwise, you still need a bootloader. If the flash drive is formatted to FAT32, as is usually the case, you need a bootloader than works with that filesystem, such as syslinux.

    Wolvix has a good tutorial on how to manually copy an iso to your flash drive, and install the bootloader.
    Wolvix Wiki: How to install Wolvix to a USB Flash Drive

    The process is similar for other distros. As you can see, it's much easier to just use unetbootin if a distro does not distribute an img file or hybrid iso.

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