Find the answer to your Linux question:
Results 1 to 4 of 4
I'm trying to install Lucid Puppy 5.2 on my old computer256 mb shared memory,32 mb of it given to gfx. I can install it properly in partition sda1 and start ...
Enjoy an ad free experience by logging in. Not a member yet? Register.
  1. #1
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    22

    Angry I'm having a problm with Puppy.


    I'm trying to install Lucid Puppy 5.2 on my old computer256 mb shared memory,32 mb of it given to gfx. I can install it properly in partition sda1 and start the GRUB installation it asks me a partition to put the grub files. Where do they go? I tried /dev/sda1/ and bang,it gives the error This partition is not Linux. And if i install it to sda1 by clicking ok the 2nd time and it installs and i reboot it says error file not found and grubrescue. Now I can't get Puppy to run it gives a kernel panic,I'll wipe it with DBAN. Help me where to put GRUB files.

  2. #2
    Linux Guru
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Tucson AZ
    Posts
    3,190
    What do you have on the system? Is Puppy the only operating system?
    If Puppy is the only OS, you should install to sda without any partition like sda1 so that the Grub files are in the master boot record. You need the Grub stage1 in the mbr anad the other Grub files on the Puppy partition.

    Boot the Puppy CD, open a terminal and run the command: fdisk -l (lower case Letter L in the command) and post the output here.

  3. #3
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    22
    Solved it! I ignored that and installed it there anyway. Then I learnt to configure GRUB with the ready text string. 1 more Q. Can you skip the menu and boot Puppy straight away?

  4. $spacer_open
    $spacer_close
  5. #4
    Linux Guru
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Tucson AZ
    Posts
    3,190
    Can you skip the menu and boot Puppy straight away?
    Yes. If you only have Puppy installed and keep the Puppy CD in case you have problems booting in the future, it should not be a problem. You can change the timeout entry at the top of the /boot/grub/menu.lst file to a smaller number or zero. Putting the timeout at zero doesn't give you any possibility to edit the boot menu in case of problems.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •