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Checkout things like crontab or at command Linux Crontab: 15 Awesome Cron Job Examples Understand at, atq, atrm, batch Commands using 9 Examples...
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  1. #11
    Linux Guru Lakshmipathi's Avatar
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    Checkout things like crontab or at command

    Linux Crontab: 15 Awesome Cron Job Examples

    Understand at, atq, atrm, batch Commands using 9 Examples
    First they ignore you,Then they laugh at you,Then they fight with you,Then you win. - M.K.Gandhi
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  2. #12
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    I have looked at those sites, but they did not help, I cant get the "at now + 1 min" to go along with start, stop or restart a process.
    To start a process I just write the path to it, and I have to use the PID to kill it, is there any other way? to start, stop and restart using 'at'?

  3. #13
    Linux Guru Lakshmipathi's Avatar
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    I'm not too familiar with 'at' but I would do something like invoke a script via 'crontab' file.

    The script will do the following

    1)Start the process-A
    2)Get pid of the process using 'echo $!'
    2.1)Sleep for 120 seconds
    3) kill the process id obtained in step 2
    4)Start the process again
    First they ignore you,Then they laugh at you,Then they fight with you,Then you win. - M.K.Gandhi
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  4. #14
    Penguin of trust elija's Avatar
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    Taking the Apache web server as an example I can do the following as root:

    Code:
    at now +2 min<ENTER>
    systemctl restart apache2<ENTER>
    <CTRL+D>
    This schedules a restart of the web server in 2 minutes. I am using openSUSE, please bear in mind that the command you are scheduling (the systemctl line) may vary by distro. For example, if I recall correctly, the same thing in Red Hat is:

    Code:
    at now +2 min<ENTER>
    service httpd restart<ENTER>
    <CTRL+D>
    You could write a simple script, or indeed a not so simple one, as a normal user. For example in a file called test.sh in your ~/Documents/scripts directory which you can create if you don't have one.
    Code:
    #!/bin/bash
    mkdir test
    cd test
    echo "Hello world" > hello.txt
    You will need to mark the script as executable using
    Code:
    chmod +x test.sh
    And then to have it run in two minutes you would do the following. In openSUSE this operates under the scripts directory. You end up with a file called ~/Documents/scripts/test/hello.txt. If you are wondering, ~ is the current user's home directory, in my case /home/elija/
    Code:
    at now +2 min<ENTER>
    ~/Documents/scripts/test.sh<ENTER>
    <CTRL+D>
    Last edited by elija; 05-29-2013 at 03:37 PM. Reason: Forgot to mark it executable among other things!
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