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Hello! I am very, very new to linux, but I'd like to understand it better, the problem is that I don't have any books on the subject atm. I did ...
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  1. #1
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    Simple command help!


    Hello! I am very, very new to linux, but I'd like to understand it better, the problem is that I don't have any books on the subject atm. I did find a 'hands on' guide to the basics in linux, but like I said, i'm new, and in this guide there were questions but he did not say how I should solve them, he only said whats common is big distros, I just need som help to get me started I think.
    - How many partitions are on your system?
    How can I find out? I use puppy livelinux (usb)
    - Go to the tmp directory in /var
    - Now go to share in /usr using only one command. Change to
    doc
    -What is your present working directory?
    ehm.. No where could I find how to do this in this guide, I have seen stuff like export $PATH , but thats all.

    I have more questions, but if someone would be kind to help me with these maybe I manage the other myself, thx

  2. #2
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    You could google 'linux command' and get sites like the ones below:

    LinuxCommand.org: Learn the Linux command line. Write shell scripts.

    Introduction to Linux

    Have you gone to the Puppy Linux forums? You can read posts regarding specific problems.

  3. #3
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    I'll give it a try, and others can correct my errors... !

    1. I have three partitions: / (which is for root), /home (which is for user), and swap. Does that answer your question? If I misunderstood you, let me know, please.

    2. How you can find out how many partitions you have ... well. most of us know that, because we had to partition and format our drives when we installed Linux. Have you done that yet, or are you running off a USB stick as you would with a Live CD or DVD?

    But to answer your question, if somebody sat me down in front of a Linux box I knew nothing about and asked me to tell them how many partitions it had, I would reach for my copy (on CD) of PartEd Magic. Look it up (Google it), and do get one. It can really come in handy!

    3. OK, to change to another directory, I would work as user, which means my prompt (what you see on your terminal if you are using the Command Line Interface, or CLI for short) is a dollar sign, not a hash mark. So
    Code:
     $ cd /var
    and hit Enter.

    4. To go from the directory /var to the directory /usr/share,
    Code:
    $ cd  /usr/share
    and Enter.

    5. Change to doc? I need some help from you here. Tell me more about what you are trying to do. That means my response to your sixth question may be off base.

    6. To find out what directory you are in, enter
    Code:
     $ pwd
    You might take a look at Linux Phrasebook by Granneman; the ISBN-13 is 978-0-672-32838-1 It is a bit expensive, but it's pretty good. Years ago, I liked Linux Installation Configuration Use by Kofler, but I think that is not available in a current edition.

    Over to you....

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  5. #4
    Linux Guru Lakshmipathi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by klskl View Post
    Hello! I am very, very new to linux, but I'd like to understand it better, the problem is that I don't have any books on the subject atm. I did find a 'hands on' guide to the basics in linux, but like I said, i'm new, and in this guide there were questions but he did not say how I should solve them, he only said whats common is big distros, I just need som help to get me started I think.
    - How many partitions are on your system?
    How can I find out? I use puppy livelinux (usb)
    - Go to the tmp directory in /var
    - Now go to share in /usr using only one command. Change to
    doc
    -What is your present working directory?
    ehm.. No where could I find how to do this in this guide, I have seen stuff like export $PATH , but thats all.

    I have more questions, but if someone would be kind to help me with these maybe I manage the other myself, thx
    Checkout this tutorial http://www.giis.co.in/linux_help.html I wrote it some time back - I'll be glad to receive your comments/feedback on it
    First they ignore you,Then they laugh at you,Then they fight with you,Then you win. - M.K.Gandhi
    -----
    FOSS India Award winning ext3fs Undelete tool www.giis.co.in. Online Linux Terminal http://www.webminal.org

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    See, when someone else do it, it sounds so easy, thanks you guys. The 'change to doc' part, I'm not sure myself, I wrote it exactly as it stood, but your answer is sufficient, ty.

    I will look through the sites you guys suggested, but please, stay close

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lakshmipathi View Post
    Checkout this tutorial *DID NOT GET TO POST URL* I wrote it some time back - I'll be glad to receive your comments/feedback on it
    When I got to the stuff about permission, I accually said, out loud, 'good **** man, good ****' so yes it was helpful, thanks.

    Some other questions doh, if you may.
    - Change ownership of /etc to your own user and group
    I get the changing of rwx, but ownership? Is it complicated?
    And this one..
    -Use the cut command on the output of a long directory listing in order to display only the file
    permissions. Then pipe this output to sort and uniq to filter out any double lines. Then use the
    wc to count the different permission types in this directory

    So.. the output, from writing -ls directory_name? then what, -cut something (to only show permissions) the pipe I understand, but help me out please

  8. #7
    Linux Guru Lakshmipathi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by klskl View Post
    When I got to the stuff about permission, I accually said, out loud, 'good **** man, good ****' so yes it was helpful, thanks.
    Thanks, for the comments Happy to hear them


    - Change ownership of /etc to your own user and group
    I get the changing of rwx, but ownership? Is it complicated?
    You can't change ownership of directory which you don't own. For example, /etc/ has important system configuration files. So only 'root' user
    (administrator) can decide whether he wants to share those files or not. Almost all system won't allow normal users to access/modify these files.



    And this one..
    -Use the cut command on the output of a long directory listing in order to display only the file
    permissions. Then pipe this output to sort and uniq to filter out any double lines. Then use the
    wc to count the different permission types in this directory
    So.. the output, from writing -ls directory_name? then what, -cut something (to only show permissions) the pipe I understand, but help me out please
    If I understand your requirement correctly,

    Code:
    ls -l /home/laks | cut -f1 -d' '
    will display permission from directory named '/home/laks' but not file names

    If you are just looking for all permissions use pipe with less command.

    Code:
    ls -l /home/laks | less
    Feel free to ask more questions
    Last edited by Lakshmipathi; 05-28-2013 at 06:41 PM. Reason: typos
    First they ignore you,Then they laugh at you,Then they fight with you,Then you win. - M.K.Gandhi
    -----
    FOSS India Award winning ext3fs Undelete tool www.giis.co.in. Online Linux Terminal http://www.webminal.org

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    hmm, It is possible for root to change ownership? Any suggestions on how he could do that, if he can?

    I'm supposed to make a script (something like 'hello world'), and make a directory, then move the script to the directory and permanently add the new directory to the search path then "Test that the script can be executed without giving a path to its actual location"
    Now, I can make a directory (in your guide) and change the permissions of it, but how do I make a script? It this somewhat correct?

    #!/bin/bash
    clear
    echo "Good morning, world."

    In a text editor?
    How do I permanently add the directory to the search path? , How do I test the script, and how do I give the script a search path?
    After some help with these I think I'm all set, I will just practise all of this a while, so thank you.

  10. #9
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    The script you posted should work. You need to make it executable: chmod +x hello.sh (that assumes you are in the directory where the file resides and that you named the file hello.sh)

    In a terminal type the following as user: $PATH (exactly, uppercase) and view the output. Since you're in a learning process, googling add a directory to path in Linux will get you a lot of simple tutorials/examples.

  11. #10
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    Guys... I need you help!
    How do I get a process to start at a specific time, lets say I want it to start in 5min? or 15:00?

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