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HI, I'm new to Linux I used a free program which installs a distribution on a usb flash drive to be used. Some of you may know the one I ...
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  1. #1
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    Problems with booting from USB


    HI, I'm new to Linux

    I used a free program which installs a distribution on a usb flash drive to be used. Some of you may know the one I speak of.

    I use it to install "ubderstudent" on it, and it starts up just fine, however the problem comes when I start it up a second time.

    When I start it up, it treats it as the first time I have ever used it, that is, that it hasn't saved any of the software I installed, any of the user accounts I created, any of the files I saved... you get the idea.

    Does anyone know why it treats every startup via the USB as a brand new start? and how I can fix it? I don't really want to install it on a seperate partition on my hard drive and would love to be able to boot it from the USB flash drive, but it's not going to be possible unless I can save stuff when using it.

    EDIT: Now I've had a look around the site, this might be worth moving to the "newbie" section

  2. #2
    Linux Engineer TNFrank's Avatar
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    Give UNetbootin a try to make up a "Live" USB stick to do the install. It's super simple to use and works with all Linux Distros that I've tried. Then, after you give that a try get back to us.

  3. #3
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    That's the very thing I used.

    It isn't isolated to UberStudent, I tried the same with Trisquel, same problem, it treats each time I boot it up as the first time I've ever booted it up.

  4. #4
    Linux Engineer TNFrank's Avatar
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    Unless you're running an Ubuntu variant and add persistence when you install the iso you'll not keep any settings so when you reboot to the Live USB it'll always be like the first time you booted to it.

  5. #5
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    Most of the programs used for this purpose (you neglected to mention which one you used? ) do and are meant to do exactly what you report. It is simply a Live CD on a flash drive and is a read-only system. You will not be able to save anything on reboot unless you do as suggested above and create it with persistence or do an actual install to the flash drive. For a full install, you would need more drive space. Unetbootin can do that for some systems, mostly Ubuntu derivatives. Don't know if it would work with the two you mention as I've never heard of either.

  6. #6
    Linux Engineer TNFrank's Avatar
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    First I would suggest that you use at least an 8GB USB stick. Then when you use UNetbootin to install an Ubuntu variant Op System put 2000 MB into the box labeled "Persistence" , that'll give you "memory" for installs and changes that you do when booted to the USB. If you plan on installing a lot of stuff then move up to a 16GB USB and up the Persistence. You'll need around 6GB for many of the installs(5.7GB IIRC for Ubuntu) sometimes a bit less but let's just say 6GB so you'll have plenty of room. Give it another try and report back to us.

  7. #7
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    Thanks guys, I'll give that a bash soon, probably after my Uni exam on Monday as until then I'm studying.

    I'm using an 8gb stick, so we'll see how it goes.

  8. #8
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    I noticed on re-reading your posts that you had indicated you used unetbootin. As explained above, you can create a persistent file for most Ubuntu distributions. If you format as FAT32 filesystem, I believe the maximum size is 4GB. If you use an ext2 filesystem you can create a larger persistent file. If you have problems while creating a large persistent file, just do the minimun and later you can delete the casper-rw file (the persistent file) and create a larger one on a separate partition.

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