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  1. #1

    Distro with programming tools built in


    I am willing to install a Linux version that has programming tools built in. (Puppy is very limited.)

    Who is a programmer and what distro are you using ?

  2. #2
    Linux Engineer
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
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    Saint Paul, MN
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    Any of this will allow the development tools to be present:
    * Mint
    * Fedora
    * openSuse
    * ubuntu
    * Debian
    * ....

  3. #3
    Linux Enthusiast sgosnell's Avatar
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    I don't think the programming tools are installed by default in any distro (I could be wrong, I certainly haven't tried every distro, and haven't researched this at all) but are readily available in the repositories, and can be installed easily.

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  5. #4
    You are right. Mint did not.

    Even when I installed them including a GUI frontend, programming will be a very long process.

    This is the only area I found where Windoze is much easier to get started in programming.

    There are packages than let you program in assembly without setting up any paths, libraries, etc.

    It is all done for you.

    They provide many source code examples and you just tell it to build and then run it.

    I have yet to find any Linux programming forums.

  6. #5
    Linux Guru
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    Most of the distros have a simple way to start to set up your programming environment. It does depend on the language and type of programming though. For a C programming there will something like build-essential for debian and family that you can install with apt-get. Suse as I recall has a group that would give the basic C programming requirements. You might install autotools as well, depending on your goals. If you are planning on learning/using a scripting language they are sometimes preinstalled but usually easily installed from the repos.

  7. #6
    Thanks.

    How do I block the flash ads here ?

    Flash Block is not working.

  8. #7
    Slackware. Full install has them built in.

    Slackware Overview
    Slackware Linux is a complete 32-bit multitasking "UNIX-like" system. It's currently based around the 2.6 Linux kernel series and the GNU C Library version 2.7 (libc6). It contains an easy to use installation program, extensive online documentation, and a menu-driven package system. A full installation gives you the X Window System, C/C++ development environments, Perl, networking utilities, a mail server, a news server, a web server, an ftp server, the GNU Image Manipulation Program, Mozilla Firefox, plus many more programs. Slackware Linux can run on 486 systems all the way up to the latest x86 machines (but uses -mcpu=i686 optimization for best performance on i686-class machines like the P3, P4, Duron/Athlon, and the latest multi-core x86 CPUs).

  9. #8
    Thanks I will install Slackware.

  10. #9
    I use UBlock for ad blocking. No ram leaks and it covers flash ads also.

  11. #10
    Linux Newbie
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    Apr 2010
    Location
    London, UK
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    113
    Quote Originally Posted by fixit7 View Post
    You are right. Mint did not.

    Even when I installed them including a GUI frontend, programming will be a very long process.

    This is the only area I found where Windoze is much easier to get started in programming.

    There are packages than let you program in assembly without setting up any paths, libraries, etc.

    It is all done for you.

    They provide many source code examples and you just tell it to build and then run it.

    I have yet to find any Linux programming forums.
    Having come from Windows programming to Linux, have had the opposite experience. Web development and web servers seem more readily available and in terms of forums, I find all I need from the specific forums for specific technologies, e.g. PHP, Python, MySQL, Java - these are not Linux specific, but I have not had trouble finding Linux guides on how to do things either.

    I am not sure about assembly as I only did that in Windows for my Comp Sci degree and have no need to touch it again! My friend wrote an assembly code emulator back then I recall.

    Is it just assembly you have had issues with? You will probably have a lot more luck with anything else!

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