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So got hold of kanotix, relly nice. Now I need to move all my data from the cursed ntfs drives to something linux will also be able to write to. ...
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  1. #1
    Just Joined! zonker66's Avatar
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    partition types for different data


    So got hold of kanotix, relly nice. Now I need to move all my data from the cursed ntfs drives to something linux will also be able to write to. But how should i partition the drives?
    I read that for big files like video (700-1200mb) xfs was better than reiserfs or ext3, but dont know if this is true.
    I have a 250 gb drive that need to hold mp3 files (thats a lot of small files), another 250 gb needs to hold big videofiles, -what partition system should be used on these disks?

    -and when i format them, how do i make them accesible to all users?

    thanks, zonker

  2. #2
    Linux Guru antidrugue's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by zonker66
    I have a 250 gb drive that need to hold mp3 files (thats a lot of small files),
    Still, mp3 (2-5 mb) are not considered small files, so ReiserFS will not be that efficient with them (it likes < 1000k files).

    Quote Originally Posted by zonker66
    another 250 gb needs to hold big videofiles, -what partition system should be used on these disks?
    I hear XFS is very good for that. But personaly I prefer the good old EXT3, which is an all-around performer, as well as being very reliable and flexible.

    Some documentation :
    http://www.debian-administration.org/articles/388
    http://fsbench.netnation.com/
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Filesystem

    Quote Originally Posted by zonker66
    -and when i format them, how do i make them accesible to all users?
    A simple entry in /etc/fstab should do the trick.
    "To express yourself in freedom, you must die to everything of yesterday. From the 'old', you derive security; from the 'new', you gain the flow."

    -Bruce Lee

  3. #3
    Just Joined! zonker66's Avatar
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    ok, thanks, i formatted two 250gb with xfs and one with ext3, and moved the data, all went fine.
    Now i would like that my user profile has read/write acess to the disks when i log in, not only as root , but how do i do that?
    Can i create a group that includes me and assignn read/write access to that group, or do i have to change the owner from root to me? or is there another preferable way to do that?

  4. #4
    Linux Guru antidrugue's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by zonker66
    Now i would like that my user profile has read/write acess to the disks when i log in, not only as root , but how do i do that?
    What is the content of /etc/fstab?

    This disk is physically in your computer? (if so, the "defaults" mount options should give your user access).

    Make sure the permissions on the drive are OK :
    Code:
    man chmod
    Make sure the drive is mounted OK :
    Code:
    man mount
    and

    Code:
    man fstab
    "To express yourself in freedom, you must die to everything of yesterday. From the 'old', you derive security; from the 'new', you gain the flow."

    -Bruce Lee

  5. #5
    Just Joined! zonker66's Avatar
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    thanks for the instant reply! im still formatting and moving data (i have 9 hds to manage). The hds are all in the machine, i just persumed that only root had write acess to anything except home folder. Ill use the man pages and only return if i get totally lost,
    thx again

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