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I put the CD in the tray and booted to Mepis. When I got in to Qparted the hard drive in loaded with files, but if I need a special ...
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  1. #11
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    Exclamation Here's What I Have!


    I put the CD in the tray and booted to Mepis. When I got in to Qparted the hard drive in loaded with files, but if I need a special driver to see them from windows everything is empty. This got me thinking because I wanted to see what the Linux disk was able to see. Here is what I found. All of you Linux analyzer's help me out!

    01 dev/sda ntfs active 74.50 GB
    02 dev/sda free 7.84 MB

    01 dev/sd1 ntfs 29.38GB used space 3.01
    (start - 0.03 end - 29.3 New Volume
    02 dev/sdb1 free 5.12 MB
    03 dev/sdb3 extended 10.34GB
    04 dev/sdb5 ext3 3.91GB used space 2.23GB
    05 dev/sdb6 linux-swap 2.00GB
    06 dev/sdb7 ext3 4.44GB
    07 dev/sdb2 ntfs 34.77GB
    08 dev/sdb1 free 7.84MB

    also ..........

    01 dev/sdc1 free 0.09 NA
    02 dev/sdc1 fat 16 976.38MB
    03 dev/sdc free 7.84 NA

    I am certain this doesn't look right because I have two ext3 partitions right? As a newbie what do I do? I will wait for a reply before deleting and starting over.

  2. #12
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    Cool Puzzled!

    How comes every time I use the Live Cd for Mepis 64 bit it changes the time and moves it ahead one hour on my computer? This is not normal!

  3. #13
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    Forget the clock temporarily as the CD doesn't record new information. The CD image may be created at a time zone one hour different from yours.

    Now you are telling us you have 3 disks of either all Sata or some of them are external USB . My guess is sdc could be a memory drive. If sdb is an external disk your Mepis will not boot. Mepis will work if sdb is an internal disk.

    Since you do have the partitions suitable for installation why not tell Mepis installer to install into sdb5 and use sdb6 as the swap?

    My guess is you could have already installed the damn thing but don't know how to boot it as you may not have specified the boot loader to occupy the MBR.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shep72
    05 dev/sdb6 linux-swap 2.00GB
    You really don't need that much swap, but I suppose 2GB won't kill you. It's just a waste of harddrive space.
    Registered Linux user #270181
    TechieMoe's Tech Rants

  5. #15
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    Question What Do You Think?

    My question today should I start all over and delete everything like I did before? This will be the third time. I am installing the same way I have been taught through the pictures images from the Linux website that I download and copied to CD. What am I doing wrong? Please look at the previous findings what I sent out at 9:15pm last night and tell me if this looks right? I can change the swap file to be 1 GB, which is half my ram memory, but what else needs to be changed.

    Like I said, my partition names are D and E, and I'm unable to see anything on those drives except through Administration Tools in Windows XP. I download the file EXT2ifs last night, which is to enable me to see Linux files on my Windows system. What I see there is this, but only through Administration Tools:

    New Volume
    29.38 GB NTFS Healthy

    3.91 GB
    Healthy (unknown Partition)

    2.00 GB
    Healthy (Unknown Partition)

    4.44 GB (Unknown Partition)

    New Volume
    34.77 GB NTFS
    Healthy

  6. #16
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    Hey can you stop playing with the Linux partitions in Windows?

    The way I see it you could have installed Mepis already but failed to put its boot loader in the MBR and so it doesn't boot.

    I have suggested to you to install Mepis again, using sdb5 and let sdb6 as the swap. That fell on deaf ears.

    OK Let's investigate if you do have Mepis already. Here are the steps

    (1) Boot up the Mepis CD but do not do any install.

    (2) click terminal and type
    Code:
    su
    to become the superuser thereby inherit the root privilege (that is Admin right in Windows).

    (3) Create a temporary partition in /mnt and mount sdb5 there. The commands are
    Code:
    mkdir /mnt/hdb5
    mount /dev/sdb5 /mnt/hdb5
    (4) Check if there is any file inside sdb5 by command
    Code:
    ls /mnt/sdb5
    If Mepis has been installed then you should find /, /boot, /home, /etc, /usr and many directories inside.

    If that is the case you proceed to check if Mepis has Grub installed or not by asking Mepis to display the content of Grub's configuration with command
    Code:
    cat /mnt/sdb5/boot/grub/menu.lst
    See if you can paste Grub's menu.lst so that we could advise if it is worth to put it into the MBR. Once Grub is planted into the MBR you become dependent on Grub to boot Windows.

    Remember if any of the systems doesn't boot don't panic as it is dead easy to restore boot loaders.

    If the above shows up nothing then do a re-install.

    You can worry about the size of the swap later.
    ------------------------------------
    Actually come to think of it if you have extifs why not mount the Linux partition sdb5, the with with 3.9x Gb, and find out if the Linux tree structure is inside or not. Do you know how to use extifs?

    If you click it from Control panel (I think) you can select a Linux partition to mount as a drive in Windows. If it doesn't mount that means there is no filing system inside and your previous installation has failed.

  7. #17
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    Cool Your Could be Wrong!

    I don't appreciate communication like "damn thing" in your previous help file. The Grub loaded just fine, that's why I can't understand the problem. However, I will follow your information and see where it leads me.

    You must be having a bad day, or have a problem of learning how to communicate so things don't fall on "deaf ears." If I'm speaking to and administrator, I'm sorry, but I still think you need to clean up your act.

  8. #18
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    You see I do have difficulty in understanding your problem.

    If you have Grub that means Mepis has been installed successfully and you ca boot it. This business of installing Mepis into ntfs partitions is just a diversion tactic then.

    Just for the sake of it I installed Mepis 6.0.4 in my hdd60 partition a few minutes ago and it took just under 8 minutes. Big deal for a Mepis installation, isn't it? I am using it to do this reply.

    The Mepis Documents/QUICK-START.html tells me the passwords for both demo and root. I notice in the installation Mepis installer did ask you to supply the default ordinary user as well as the root user passwords. Thus if you are stuck and can't pass through the password hurdle then it could be (1) You forgot what you typed in as passwords or (2) Mepis has a bug and forgot your password. That latter is quite common.

    In that case you can use Mepis installation CD to rectify the password problem as follow

    (1) While boot up Mepis Live CD take a look at the /home/demo/Documents/MEPIS-QUICK-START.html and write down the password for root.

    (2) Click Mepis icon to log out as the demo user.

    (3) Re-enter Mepis as the root user and supply the root password.

    (4) Mount the sdb5 partition as indicated in Post #16, then "change root" into the installed hard disk version of Mepis, issue the command passwd to change the root password, supply the password twice, exit back to the CD version of Mepis and reboot
    Code:
    mkdir /mnt/hdb5
    mount /dev/sdb5 /mnt/hdb5
    chroot /mnt/sdb5
    passwd
    enter root password twice here
    exit
    reboot
    On a reboot you should be able to enter Mepis as the root user.

    If you only want to enter Mepis as an ordinary user (more secure from being hacked) then add a user (say Shep72) as follow in terminal mode
    Code:
    useradd Shep72
    passwd Shed72
    enter root password twice here
    I believe the above should solve your problem.

    Just a few lines to explain the above

    If you issue command "passwd" without a name it defaults to the root user.
    After you "change root" into /mnt/sdb5 you are actually inside the hard disk version of Mepis. Learn this technique as it is very useful for rescuing a Linux.
    Mepis can be used as a Live CD. When you log in as root in Live CD you inherit the root privilege to get into any Linux and Windows. Therefore you can use Mepis Live CD to recover all the files when a XP or Vista fails to boot.

    Enjoy Mepis. Haven't used it for about a year myself (although got it in the PC) and the newer version certainly upholding Mepis tradition of being a nice and easy to work with distro.

  9. #19
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    Wink Thanks for All the Help From Everyone!

    I'm up and running now! What was the problem? I'm unsure, but I think I was continually trying to install to a windows partition. I followed the good advice to just let Linux set the partitions. I did much of the prepatory work in windows where I'm in familiar territory and this was not a good thing to be doing.

    Thank you Saikee, your advice was very helpful. Somehow I overlooked some of your advice by mistake. I will read the forum files better in the future. You are obvious and experienced Linux man and perhaps someday I will be.

    Best of luck in the future! When I figure this operating system out I'll be back to help someone else. If I run into problems I'll be back sooner.

  10. #20
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    If you have a need to resize the partition use the Livd CD gparted 3.3 or Parted Magic 1.3.

    Try not to delete any logical partition as Linux doesn't like it. Deletion of primary partitions not affecting the Linux are OK. Just remember Linux keeps a record of the partitions it was installed. If you upset the partition references Linux would not find its way back. It is however a trivial task to move a Linux from partition to partition so everything can be repaired.

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