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No, I am not talking about the demo password, but the password for opening Linux on the hard drive after installation. I am duel booting with Windows Xp Professional on ...
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    Question Duel Boot \ Linux Mepis Will Not Accept Password!


    No, I am not talking about the demo password, but the password for opening Linux on the hard drive after installation. I am duel booting with Windows Xp Professional on the first drive, which is 32bit. My computer is 64bit, so I downloaded the new 64bit Mepis on Dvd, burned it, and set off to install it on my second hard drive. Both my hard drives are SATA. I downloaded the "picture images" which is great for instruction unto those that are inexperienced with Linux. This is my first Linux installation.

    Here's my problem! I have installed Mepis 64 bit twice because it will not accpet my password when installing to the hard drive. The choice of partitions was NTFS. Is this wrong? I read on the internet that Linux doesn't like NTFS, a better choice is FAT. Which type is better for the use of 64 bit Athlon? Why the choice of NTFS if you can't use it? More information to come later after I get a reply for help.

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    Linux Guru techieMoe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shep72
    No, I am not talking about the demo password, but the password for opening Linux on the hard drive after installation.
    This password *should* have been set by you during the installation. Was it not?

    Here's my problem! I have installed Mepis 64 bit twice because it will not accpet my password when installing to the hard drive. The choice of partitions was NTFS. Is this wrong?
    I'm not sure I follow. The Mepis installer should have asked where you wanted to install it and you would point it to a partition or some empty space. Are you saying you pointed it to an NTFS-formatted partition?

    I read on the internet that Linux doesn't like NTFS, a better choice is FAT. Which type is better for the use of 64 bit Athlon? Why the choice of NTFS if you can't use it? More information to come later after I get a reply for help.
    NTFS can be read by Linux just fine, but writing to it can be a bit hairy. Linux has its own partitioning schemes (EXT2, ReiserFS) that work better than FAT. You only need a FAT32 partition if you want to share data between Linux and MS Windows.
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    Wink Thanks for the Quick Reply!

    In answer to your question, yes I did give Linux my own password while installing, but that password is not accepted. The first time I installed my password I believed it was short for it was only 4 letters long and it needs to be 8 characters. So, I completed deleted all partitions and fixed the mbr of my Windows XP Professional operationg system on hard drive one and proceeded to install everything again after formatting. I reformatted in NTFS!

    Not all the files were erased because when I got ready to install some of the previous choices were still there, but not a problem I dont think because the hard drive had been formatted. This time I chose a longer password, but the install was a failure because my password is still not accepted.

    Thank you for the information on NTFS! I have an 80 gb hard drive, so I split the hard drive and installed Linux on 40 gb's. I installed Linux on the first partition, ext3 file system, swap file on the second partition, and home on the third partition, and I'm allowed four partitions. I thought I did everything right, but apparently I didn't.

    Please, help me do everything right from square one. I can delete everything again if need be. My desire is to try out Linux 64 bit and compare to Windows XP 32 bit. I would like to have the use of all my motherboard's potential, which is an Asus32 SLI Deluxe. Nice! Nice! Nice! motherboard!

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    Linux Guru techieMoe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shep72
    Not all the files were erased because when I got ready to install some of the previous choices were still there, but not a problem I dont think because the hard drive had been formatted. This time I chose a longer password, but the install was a failure because my password is still not accepted.
    So even after reinstalling you still can't log in? Or did you just not get to finish the install because your password was too short?

    Thank you for the information on NTFS! I have an 80 gb hard drive, so I split the hard drive and installed Linux on 40 gb's. I installed Linux on the first partition, ext3 file system, swap file on the second partition, and home on the third partition, and I'm allowed four partitions. I thought I did everything right, but apparently I didn't.
    Strictly speaking, that extra partition for /home isn't necessary. Also, don't allocate too much space for your SWAP. If you have a reasonably new system with 1GB or more of RAM you only need a 512MB swap space at the maximum. Anything more is just a waste because Linux only uses that space when it runs out of physical memory.
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    Wink Comin' Back to You!

    This is correct! I am unable to log in after a complete successful install. I used 4 Gb for swap space. I have 2 Gb of Ram Memory and it's 4000pc. Do you think this is the problem? What others suggestions do you have anybody else out their can help.

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    I really don't know what is the problem here.

    NTFS filing system is MS proprietary product not used by Linux. In fact Simply Mepis is not supposed to write on it without specially loaded driver. Therefore there should never be an installation if NTFS partitions are offered to the Linux installer.

    Mepis is an installable Live CD. That means a user can use it without installing into the hard disk. Therefore all the partitioning tools for creating partitions suitable for Linux are available.

    If you have NTFS partitions that can be used for Linux installation use Mepis' cfdisk program in terminal mode to alter the partition type 7 (for NTFS) to 83 (for native Linux). Similarly alter another NTFS partition to Type 82 (for swap).

    Alternatively you can use cfdisk program to delete the unwanted partitions create new ones fro the Linux. Mepis needs no more than 5Gb for residence and swap is about 1GB.

    Submit the two partitions to Mepis installer and you will see a succesful installation.

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    Unhappy Good Thought!

    Here is something that is very confusing! When I click on my D drive where I installed Mepis, the is nothing on the hard drive. The whole thing is empty as I look at it. This means nothing installed even though it said the installation was successful. Am I right? What am I doing wrong?

    Remember, I'm new to Linux and I have no idea what you're talking about and I might even be lacking in the know how to get it done. I don't know how to change the partition from the terminal, but if nothing is there why do I need too? I am totally confused!!!!!! Please, help!

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    You don't want to create a NTFS or FAT32 partition for Linux (we got a lot of file systems: ext2, ext3, reiserfs, xfs, jfs ...) , don't even create a partition. Just let the installer create it. But double check it isn't overwriting your Windows installation.
    BTW, Linux doesn't use C: , D: , E:

    Windows Linux
    C: /dev/hda1
    D: /dev/hda2
    E: /dev/hda3
    etc
    Put your hand in an oven for a minute and it will be like an hour, sit beside a beautiful woman for an hour and it will be like a minute, that is relativity. --Albert Einstein
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    Question Thanks Juan!

    I do believe my problem is I created all patitions within Windows XP Professional and then installed them to that section of the hard drive.
    However, shouldn't something be there that was recorded? When I finally get the job done, your saying I will have no partitions D or E? Sorry! I should have figured that out, but I didn't.

    To reinstall what do I do next?

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    Linux Guru Juan Pablo's Avatar
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    I was just refering to the names of the partition, you won't be able to read the partition from Windows without using an special driver.

    To reinstall just put the CD on your tray and install like normal.
    Put your hand in an oven for a minute and it will be like an hour, sit beside a beautiful woman for an hour and it will be like a minute, that is relativity. --Albert Einstein
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