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First off, I am completely unfamiliar with DSL, and am used to more GUI-oriented OSes. I've been trying to install a couple of programs to DSL, and I'm having a ...
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  1. #1
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    Question Installing programs in DSL


    First off, I am completely unfamiliar with DSL, and am used to more GUI-oriented OSes. I've been trying to install a couple of programs to DSL, and I'm having a terrible time with it. I'm very used to things like Windows, so the terminal is quite different for me.

    What I've been trying to install primarily is AVG antivirus. I downloaded the .deb and .tar.tar files. I also tried to install a program from a .tar.gz None of them seem to work, and I don't know what I'm doing wrong/ not doing right.

    I found a tutorial that said after going into /usr/local/src/ to extract the tarball with tar -xzvf <filename> Whenever I use this command, however, I'm given the error message: syntax error near unexpected token 'newline' The ./configure command does not seem to work either; I just get a message saying that the file or directory does not exist.

    Can anyone give me some tips or point me to a very in-depth or basic tutorial?

  2. #2
    Linux Engineer scrarfussi's Avatar
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    As a newbie i'd say your choice of starting with an os like dsl which is terminal based was a bad idea u could hav started with some simple distro like ubuntu or pclinuxos . Also i don't think you need to worry about antivirus in linux i'll post you a few links in a short while for good tutorials but meanwhile you can type "man tar" tis a manual on the tar command you can also type "man tab tab " you will get a msg asking to list all possible combinations and you type yes and you can check what other manuals are available good luck

  3. #3
    Linux User netstrider's Avatar
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    As mentioned by scarfussi, DSL is probably not your best bet. However if I'm not mistaken you have apt-get as a package management system on DSL. First off, check here for a detailed explanation on how to install software in Linux.

    Alternatively, you could try apt-cache search antivirus in the terminal. Once you find anything you like you can download and have it installed by loging in as root and running apt-get install <packagename>.

    Good luck.

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    Quote Originally Posted by scrarfussi View Post
    As a newbie i'd say your choice of starting with an os like dsl which is terminal based was a bad idea u could hav started with some simple distro like ubuntu or pclinuxos . Also i don't think you need to worry about antivirus in linux i'll post you a few links in a short while for good tutorials but meanwhile you can type "man tar" tis a manual on the tar command you can also type "man tab tab " you will get a msg asking to list all possible combinations and you type yes and you can check what other manuals are available good luck
    I realized going in that a terminal-based system was not going to be the easiest route. However, I'm working on an old computer and this was part of a project to maximize the system. While Ubuntu would be easier, I wanted to minmize the CPU and RAM usage as much as possible.

    Also, I've tried the "man" commands, and strangely, it seems to crash Bash.

    (I was actually forced to go back to Windows, due to time and the fact that I could not get my programs to install. I'd still like to learn what to do and why things weren't installing.)

  5. #5
    Linux User IsaacKuo's Avatar
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    The basic reason programs weren't installing is that while Damn Small is Debian based, it is extremely stripped down and heavily customized. It lacks the tools required by standard *nix installation packages, and it's sufficiently different from standard Debian that apt-get is hit-and-miss.

    What are the basic specifications of the computer you're using (RAM, CPU speed, hard drive space)? Unless your RAM is less than 64megs, it may be a better idea to use standard Debian. I've installed the latest release of Debian on a 120Mhz Pentium with only 48megs of RAM--including a GUI and lightweight window manager. It's not quite as stripped down as DSL, but the upside is that software installation and maintainance is trouble-free.
    Isaac Kuo, ICQ 29055726 or Yahoo mechdan

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    Quote Originally Posted by IsaacKuo View Post
    What are the basic specifications of the computer you're using (RAM, CPU speed, hard drive space)? Unless your RAM is less than 64megs, it may be a better idea to use standard Debian. I've installed the latest release of Debian on a 120Mhz Pentium with only 48megs of RAM--including a GUI and lightweight window manager. It's not quite as stripped down as DSL, but the upside is that software installation and maintainance is trouble-free.
    The computer was a Pentium III overclocked to 866mhz, 384mb RAM, and a 20 gig HDD. This was a team competition and my team was somewhat at a disadvantage in terms of Windows tweaks. We opted to try to run as bare-bones an OS as possible, but half-way through the competition we were informed that we had to download an antivirus and a couple other programs. (Initially, all the teams were given the impression that the system simply had to run correctly.)

    Everything was fine until we had to install some programs. None of the event managers could help us, and by the time we encountered this problem, it was late into the competition. So, we were fairly sunk. We didn't have the time to learn all we needed to learn about DSL and Linux. Since the competition will be held next year, however, we decided that it would be a good idea to learn what went wrong and how to do things right next time.

    Thank you for answering my question.

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  8. #8
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    synaptics

    hi
    i started wiht the dsl and its a fine linux if you have the last distrubution you can easealy install programs with synaptics and a internet conection
    to do that you will need enable apt (menu- tools)
    and then install synaptics with dsl panel
    synaptics its to install software its similar to wizard install from windows but
    synaptics do everything, it downloads the program that you had chose and install with no worries

    nmferro

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    wyldkat
    DSL is not your average linux distro. Apps can be installed used apt-get using Debian (woody) but because of the modified structure of DSL they ussualy don't work and can break DSL big time. The only fairly safe apps that can be installed in DSL is with it's own "Mydsl" app. It's something like Synaptic but only uses DSL's own supository which is VERY limited in the way of "IMO" good apps.
    If you are looking for a small Linux that is a little friendlier and will run on older hardware you may want to give Puppy Linux a shot. Plenty of apps and support too. The only problem with the current puppy version 2.16.1 is that it's dialup (winmodens) support isn't to good, but broadbrand is fine.

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