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  1. #1
    SkittleLinux18
    Guest

    Change Permissions on slave drive


    As many of you know, I wiped my XP install and put PCLOS on instead. There was a slave drive in my XP machine that had all my music files saved on it. From PCLOS, I can see the files, but I can't write to the drive or change the contents of the folders, or the folders themselves. I tried changing the permission, but I keep getting an access denied error. I am sure I am not doing this right. Some please teach it to me? Thanks!

  2. #2
    SkittleLinux18
    Guest
    I got to thinking, couldn't I just change the permissions in my fstab? If so, I am not sure what to change. So here's my fstab file-- slave drive=hdb1:

    ## fstab created by Livecd-install

    none /proc proc defaults 0 0
    none /dev/pts devpts mode=0620 0 0
    none /proc/bus/usb usbfs defaults 0 0

    # /dev/hda1, size=16370172, type=131: Journalised FS: ext3 (primary)
    /dev/hda1 / ext3 noatime 1 1

    # /dev/hda5, size=8177022, type=130: Linux swap (extended)
    /dev/hda5 swap swap defaults 0 0

    # /dev/hda6, size=366169482, type=131: Journalised FS: ext3 (extended)
    /dev/hda6 /home ext3 noatime 1 2

    # /dev/hdb1, size=78156162, type=7: NTFS (primary)
    /dev/hdb1 /mnt/win_c ntfs user,exec,ro,auto,nls=utf8,umask=0 0 0

    # cdrom: HL-DT-ST GCE-8481B
    # /dev/hdc /media/cdrom auto user,exec,ro,noauto 0 0

    # cdrom: PIONEER DVD-RW DVR-111D
    # /dev/hdd /media/cdrom2 auto user,exec,ro,noauto 0 0
    tmpfs /dev/shm tmpfs defaults 0 0
    P.S. Can a mod please correct my typo in the title? Changer should be Changing*** Thanks, it's just driving me nuts.

  3. #3
    Super Moderator devils casper's Avatar
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    You have to mount partition(s) first. You can edit /etc/fstab file to automount partition(s) as suggested by SkittleLinux18.
    Open Terminal/Konsole and execute this
    Code:
    sudo fdisk -l
    Post output here.

    Quote Originally Posted by SkittleLinux18
    P.S. Can a mod please correct my typo in the title? Changer should be Changing*** Thanks, it's just driving me nuts.
    Done !
    It is amazing what you can accomplish if you do not care who gets the credit.
    New Users: Read This First

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  5. #4
    SkittleLinux18
    Guest
    Thanks for the edit!!

    fdisk -l output:

    Disk /dev/hda: 200.0 GB, 200049647616 bytes
    255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 24321 cylinders
    Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes

    Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
    /dev/hda1 * 1 1019 8185086 83 Linux
    /dev/hda2 1020 24321 187173315 5 Extended
    /dev/hda5 1020 1528 4088511 82 Linux swap / Solaris
    /dev/hda6 1529 24321 183084741 83 Linux

    Disk /dev/hdb: 40.0 GB, 40020664320 bytes
    255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 4865 cylinders
    Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes

    Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
    /dev/hdb1 * 1 4865 39078081 7 HPFS/NTFS

  6. #5
    Super Moderator devils casper's Avatar
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    I dont know if ntfs-3g package is pre-installed in PCLinuxOS or not. Check it using Pavakge Manger. Install it if its not pre-installed. It should be available in default repos.

    Edit /etc/fstab :
    Code:
    /dev/hdb1  /mnt/win_c   ntfs-3g   defaults,umask=0 0 0
    It is amazing what you can accomplish if you do not care who gets the credit.
    New Users: Read This First

  7. #6
    SkittleLinux18
    Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by devils casper View Post
    I dont know if ntfs-3g package is pre-installed in PCLinuxOS or not. Check it using Pavakge Manger. Install it if its not pre-installed. It should be available in default repos.

    Edit /etc/fstab :
    Code:
    /dev/hdb1  /mnt/win_c   ntfs-3g   defaults,umask=0 0 0
    No they weren't installed, probably because this is MiniMe. I had to install a lot of base and core files after the live install. Anyway, packages are there now.

    As su, I did

    nano /etc/fstab
    and edited the file as you suggested. It didn't change much, though. Here is what my new fstab looks like:

    /dev/hdb1 /mnt/win_c ntfs-3g defaults,umask=0 0 0## fstab created
    by Livecd-install

    none /proc proc defaults 0 0
    none /dev/pts devpts mode=0620 0 0
    none /proc/bus/usb usbfs defaults 0 0

    # /dev/hda1, size=16370172, type=131: Journalised FS: ext3 (primary)
    /dev/hda1 / ext3 noatime 1 1

    # /dev/hda5, size=8177022, type=130: Linux swap (extended)
    /dev/hda5 swap swap defaults 0 0

    # /dev/hda6, size=366169482, type=131: Journalised FS: ext3 (extended)
    /dev/hda6 /home ext3 noatime 1 2

    # /dev/hdb1, size=78156162, type=7: NTFS (primary)
    /dev/hdb1 /mnt/win_c ntfs-3g defaults,umask=0 0 0

    # cdrom: HL-DT-ST GCE-8481B
    # /dev/hdc /media/cdrom auto user,exec,ro,noauto 0 0

    # cdrom: PIONEER DVD-RW DVR-111D
    # /dev/hdd /media/cdrom2 auto user,exec,ro,noauto 0 0
    tmpfs /dev/shm tmpfs defaults 0 0
    What next buddy?

  8. #7
    Super Moderator devils casper's Avatar
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    /dev/hdb1 /mnt/win_c ntfs-3g defaults,umask=0 0 0## fstab created
    by Livecd-install


    # /dev/hdb1, size=78156162, type=7: NTFS (primary)
    /dev/hdb1 /mnt/win_c ntfs-3g defaults,umask=0 0 0
    You have two entires of /dev/hdb1 now. Delete one of those and execute mount -a command. You will have write access in /dev/hdb1 ( /mnt/win_c ).
    It is amazing what you can accomplish if you do not care who gets the credit.
    New Users: Read This First

  9. #8
    SkittleLinux18
    Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by devils casper View Post
    ....execute mount -a command.
    Wow, this is embarrassing. I can't believe I am asking this question. Why is mount -a not working for me?

    [root@localhost Desktop]# mount -a
    mount: mount point Livecd-install does not exist

    [root@localhost Desktop]# mount -a /etc/fstab
    mount: can't find /etc/fstab in /etc/fstab or /etc/mtab

    [root@localhost Desktop]# mount -a /dev/hdb1
    fuse: mount failed: Device or resource busy

    [root@localhost Desktop]# mount -a /mnt/win_c
    fuse: mount failed: Device or resource busy

    [root@localhost Desktop]#
    Lets definitely keep this post between us.

  10. #9
    Super Moderator devils casper's Avatar
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    You must have root privileges to do that. Try these :
    Code:
    sudo mount -a
    Or
    Code:
    su -
    mount -a
    It is amazing what you can accomplish if you do not care who gets the credit.
    New Users: Read This First

  11. #10
    SkittleLinux18
    Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by devils casper View Post
    You must have root privileges to do that. Try these :
    Code:
    sudo mount -a
    Or
    Code:
    su -
    mount -a
    If you look above in my last post, I had root when I was executing this command. When I execute the command, I get a message telling me that mount point LiveCD-Install does not exist??? I thought mount -a was for fstab, not LiveCD-Install. So I cd into /etc and execute the command and I get the same error message. So I did mount --help, and this is what shows up:

    [root@localhost etc]# mount -a
    mount: mount point Livecd-install does not exist
    [root@localhost etc]# mount --help
    Usage: mount -V : print version
    mount -h : print this help
    mount : list mounted filesystems
    mount -l : idem, including volume labels
    So far the informational part. Next the mounting.
    The command is `mount [-t fstype] something somewhere'.
    Details found in /etc/fstab may be omitted.
    mount -a [-t|-O] ... : mount all stuff from /etc/fstab
    mount device : mount device at the known place
    mount directory : mount known device here
    mount -t type dev dir : ordinary mount command
    Note that one does not really mount a device, one mounts
    a filesystem (of the given type) found on the device.
    One can also mount an already visible directory tree elsewhere:
    mount --bind olddir newdir
    or move a subtree:
    mount --move olddir newdir
    A device can be given by name, say /dev/hda1 or /dev/cdrom,
    or by label, using -L label or by uuid, using -U uuid .
    Other options: [-nfFrsvw] [-o options] [-p passwdfd].
    For many more details, say man 8 mount .

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