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Hi, I have Mandrake linux 8.0 installed on my pc. All I want is a simple and powerful IDE for linux (like IntelliJIdea, no provision for gui buildeing) which could ...
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  1. #1
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    Want a simple IDE for JAVA


    Hi,
    I have Mandrake linux 8.0 installed on my pc. All I want is a simple and powerful IDE for linux (like IntelliJIdea, no provision for gui buildeing) which could help me get rid of typing classpath and provide the scope of project management. I tried with xwpe and glade but when I tried to install them (requires compilation!!) all I see are errors!!! So I want to install an error-free and pain free IDE which I will get working rite away.
    Thank you.

  2. #2
    Linux Guru sarumont's Avatar
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    Check out NetBeans. I used it when I last coded java and it's pretty nice (for an IDE ).
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    Linux User sheds's Avatar
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    I heard NetBeans is really large and slows down the computer, at least on windows. When i studied java i used JBuilder, maybe there's a version for linux. I will do some research.

  4. #4
    Linux Guru sarumont's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sheds
    I heard NetBeans is really large and slows down the computer, at least on windows. When i studied java i used JBuilder, maybe there's a version for linux. I will do some research.
    Netbeans is kinda slow, but that's due to it being written in Java.
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    Linux User sheds's Avatar
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    I didn't know that, what a disadvantage. Written in java, for java, and it works slowly, kinda says a lot huh? Anyway, i love java, since the beggining, i think it's very easy to understand the way you are suppossed to write java files.

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    One "must-try" IDE is Eclipse, my company use Eclipse for almost everything coding-wise. It is a Java IDE but it can do C/C++/PERL/Python you name it with plugins.

    Eclipse is also written in Java but I must say the speed is very impressive. Especially in the latest releases using Java 1.5.

    Give it a spin and see for yourself:
    http://www.eclipse.org/

  7. #7
    Linux Guru sarumont's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sheds
    I didn't know that, what a disadvantage. Written in java, for java, and it works slowly, kinda says a lot huh? Anyway, i love java, since the beggining, i think it's very easy to understand the way you are suppossed to write java files.
    Yeah...I've been told that Java apps. can be quite fast, and the serverlets are pretty cool (at least my bank switched to them from some super-proprietary M$ ****). I don't know much about the internals of Java, though, so I can't really speak for it. I coded java in an introductory course an uni., and we didn't get very in depth.
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    Personally, I don't like Java very much. Sure, these days it can be quite fast when it comes to purely computational tasks, since it has JIT compiler (HLE, if you will), but object creation and similar tasks are still slow, so especially string manipulation can be really slow in Java. In particular, however, all Java VMs I've tried all take up loads of memory, which makes it slow since the system has to page it in and out all the time. In all else, it's not really a very elegant language design.

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    Linux Guru techieMoe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dolda2000
    In all else, it's not really a very elegant language design.
    Being a Java developer by trade, I must disagree. What sort of language would you consider "elegant"?
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  10. #10
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    The unelegancy of Java is mainly because it was designed with a lot of implicit assumptions. That leads to unelegant definition of core concepts. For example, try to define strictly what a Java "object" is. It's certainly possible, but it involves a lot of underlying definitions, even though an object is supposed to be one of the more basal concepts in Java. The same goes for a lot of concepts in Java -- the entire definition of the language looks something similar to the cables that I have under my desk. All this is, as far as I've understood it, because they want to have "intuitive" concepts. The problem with intuitive concepts is that intuition isn't the same thing for everyone, and as soon as you begin to try and clarify them to someone who doesn't share your intuitive view of them, you often run into trouble.
    Also, Java places a lot of unnecessary restrictions all over the place. Such as you being forced to define what exceptions your methods can throw. What's that good for?
    In addition, the compilation process is too tightly bound to the actual file names that are involved. If you have a public class, it must be defined in a Java file with the same name, and it must be compiled into a class file with the same name, and so on.

    LISP, for example, is one of the languages I do consider elegant. It's very clearly and simply defined, and builds on a very elegant underlying architecture as well.
    C is another elegant language. The underlying architecture of C (the i386 CPU architecture, for example) isn't very elegant, but the language itself is a very elegant code generator, even though it might be generating code for an inelegant platform.

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