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Hi Everyone, I would like to share that our rsync has been slow lately. Even during inceremental backups, now I am still new to this but our script has been ...
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  1. #1
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    2

    Rsync slow even during Incremental


    Hi Everyone,

    I would like to share that our rsync has been slow lately. Even during inceremental backups, now I am still new to this but our script has been in our servers for awhile. I've been searching off the net for some answers but to no avail. I suspected that it was the NIC card that was the culprit. I was advised to set it to full-duplex but our NIC Card is a Gigabit one. I dunno if this applies since the other guys had Ethernets. My script is below. Any help would be very much appreciated.
    Code:
    #!/bin/bash
    
    
    #####################################################################
    #
    # This script performs incremental backups of the /etc directory
    # and full backups of /home. The incremental backup stuff is
    # kind of weird, a terrific explanation of what's going on can
    # be found here:
    #
    #####################################################################
    
    BACKUP_DIR=/mnt/backup
    RSYNC_BIN=/usr/bin/rsync
    NICE_BIN=/bin/nice
    COPY_PRIORITY=19	# -20 = highest, 19 = lowest priority
    
    if [ ! -f /mnt/backup/YES_BACKUP_IS_MOUNTED ]; then
      echo "Backup drive is NOT mounted!"
      exit -1
    fi
    
    
    #####################################################################
    #
    # This does the incremental backup of /etc. ${BACKUP_DIR}/etc.5
    # gets the backup from 5 days ago, ${BACKUP_DIR}/etc.4 gets the
    # backup from 4 days ago, etc. Each directory behaves like a
    # complete backup of /etc, but in reality the space required for
    # each extra directory is only the changes between that day's
    # backups and the next (plus a little overhead). Pretty efficient
    # stuff!
    #
    #####################################################################
    if [ -d "${BACKUP_DIR}/etc.5" ]; then
    	rm -rf ${BACKUP_DIR}/etc.5	
    fi
    if [ -d "${BACKUP_DIR}/etc.4" ]; then
    	mv ${BACKUP_DIR}/etc.4 ${BACKUP_DIR}/etc.5
    fi
    if [ -d "${BACKUP_DIR}/etc.3" ]; then
    	mv ${BACKUP_DIR}/etc.3 ${BACKUP_DIR}/etc.4
    fi
    if [ -d "${BACKUP_DIR}/etc.2" ]; then
    	mv ${BACKUP_DIR}/etc.2 ${BACKUP_DIR}/etc.3
    fi
    if [ -d "${BACKUP_DIR}/etc.1" ]; then
    	mv ${BACKUP_DIR}/etc.1 ${BACKUP_DIR}/etc.2
    fi
    if [ -d "${BACKUP_DIR}/etc.0" ]; then
    	cp -al ${BACKUP_DIR}/etc.0 ${BACKUP_DIR}/etc.1
    fi
    
    ${RSYNC_BIN} -a -v --delete --exclude=spamassassin/ /etc/ ${BACKUP_DIR}/etc.0/ 1>/tmp/etcbackup.txt 2>&1
    
    
    
    #####################################################################
    #
    # This does the backup of the /home directory. We're using rsync to
    # do the copy, but it's not incremental. Subsequent copies after the
    # first should be faster, depending on how many files have changed.
    #
    # The --delete argument ensures that we remove files from the
    # backup directory that have been removed from the source directory.
    #
    # Redirecting stdout and stderr because given the size of the data
    # that we're copying, we invariably come across files that have been
    # removed by the time that we get to them (and this outputs an
    # error message).
    #
    #####################################################################
    ${NICE_BIN} -n ${COPY_PRIORITY} ${RSYNC_BIN} -a -v --delete /home/ ${BACKUP_DIR}/home/ 1>/tmp/homebackup.txt 2>&1

  2. #2
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    2
    Hi guys...Any thoughts on this?

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