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I want to create a user login system that will look up the users in a database. I will be having over 2000 users, it's for a small library, that ...
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  1. #1
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    creating a user login system with a database


    I want to create a user login system that will look up the users in a database. I will be having over 2000 users, it's for a small library, that will each be logging in using their library card number. This is necessary as I need to keep track and make reports of every patron that is using the library computers.

    I would like each patron to have to login into the library computers individually and I would like there to be a time out setting. I also would be using MySQL as the database.

    So I would much appreciate it if someone could point me in the right direction as how this can be done.


    Thanks.

  2. #2
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    You may want to look into implementing LDAP. It can provide basic single-sign-on services like you desire.

    What you need to do: Setup a server setup as the domain controller (LDAP server), setup workstations to use LDAP to authenticate users.

    To import all the users, you can write a simple bash script to do this.

  3. #3
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    Look in to these:
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  4. #4
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    I would agree with mizzle that LDAP is a good approach, and widely used these days. OpenLDAP is also compatible with Windows Active Directory, but (possibly important to you) free, and open source. You can configure it so that the users login with their library card numbers, allowing them to set their own passwords at first login after you have installed and configured the system. I don't recommend aging out passwords in a situation such as yours, but do require a combination of letters and numbers, with a minimum length of 8 characters or so.
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

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