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Hi All, Can any one help me in understanding the implementation/design of backup/Restore utilities to tape in linux. Any docs/pointers will be helpful. My basic doubt is what are the ...
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    Linux Backup/Restore utility design


    Hi All,

    Can any one help me in understanding the implementation/design of backup/Restore utilities to tape in linux.
    Any docs/pointers will be helpful.

    My basic doubt is what are the basic components of the backup/restore utility programm. I am not speaking about the linux native backup utility commands like
    tar, cpio, dd etc..

    -- Regards
    rajesh

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    Take a look at free-backup.info

    Amanda (www.amanda.org) is 2005 Favorite Backup System (Linux Journal Readers' Choice 2005)

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    Quote Originally Posted by rajeshk
    My basic doubt is what are the basic components of the backup/restore utility programm. I am not speaking about the linux native backup utility commands like
    tar, cpio, dd etc..
    What exactly are you referring to with "the backup/restore utility program"? As far as I know, there is no such thing as "the" backup program in Linux. If anything could be called "the" backup program in Linux, it would be the tar, cpio, dd, etc. suite of programs.

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    Linux Guru fingal's Avatar
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    I think it also depends on what your basic needs are. If you want to backup to tape then tar is the one to use (it actually derives from 'tape archive'). People seem to favour different strategies for backing up.

    Network backups may differ, and a programme which you might be interested in is rsync ... details of which are here.

    Also check out this page:http://samba.anu.edu.au/rsync/examples.html

    Scripts are useful for performing backups.
    I am always doing that which I can not do, in order that I may learn how to do it. - Pablo Picasso

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    Linux User DThor's Avatar
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    Just guessing myself, but perhaps rajeshk is looking more for backup design *theory* in Linux(read:unix), which would certainly have major differences to say, Windows. Perhaps he wants to write a utility? Anyway, certainly looking at existing freely available utils as mentioned here or found on sourceforge is a good start. To understand backups, I would argue you really need to understand the OS and the way it works, however.

    DT

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    Linux Guru fingal's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DThor
    Just guessing myself, but perhaps rajeshk is looking more for backup design *theory* in Linux(read:unix), which would certainly have major differences to say, Windows. Perhaps he wants to write a utility? Anyway, certainly looking at existing freely available utils as mentioned here or found on sourceforge is a good start. To understand backups, I would argue you really need to understand the OS and the way it works, however.

    DT
    That also occured to me. Actually the topic is quite complicated, and I spent most of last weekend reading up about backups. I decided that:

    1. it's not very interesting, but it's essential &
    2. no-one agrees exactly on the 'best way' to do it &
    3. using tar + bzip2 is a bit more complicated that it seems at first
    4. the number of backup scripts out there is terrifying ...
    5. definitely a very different approach is needed from the Windows philosophy

    Just my 2 pence worth.
    I am always doing that which I can not do, in order that I may learn how to do it. - Pablo Picasso

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    Linux User DThor's Avatar
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    Agreed. I admire those that write freely available backup utils, and there are some nice ones out there. I had my own little homebrew version a while back, but as the size and users grew, so did the headaches, so we copped out, got a huge frickin' SDLT Superloader and a commercial backup solution - now I don't even think about it anymore. (oh - all Linux btw)

    One of the hot new areas of backup design is realtime access for large networks. You always maintain a "hot" disk which has the whole mess of the last backups right there for instant access, and backup to tape the previous set, repeat. It's becoming a standard for the large, realtime institutions.

    And yep, it's boring...

    DT

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    Quote Originally Posted by DThor
    Just guessing myself, but perhaps rajeshk is looking more for backup design *theory* in Linux(read:unix), which would certainly have major differences to say, Windows. Perhaps he wants to write a utility? Anyway, certainly looking at existing freely available utils as mentioned here or found on sourceforge is a good start. To understand backups, I would argue you really need to understand the OS and the way it works, however.

    DT
    Hi DT,

    You are right. I am looking for general backup design theory. Well i am much compfortable with linux OS. Ther are buch of bacup/restore software availbale in market ( HP, Backbone's netvault, IBM's Tivoli etc.. ) I am interested in the basic design of these all backup utilites.

    I understand that All backup / Restore uitilities avialable in market have something common in them, Iam reffering design apporach.

    Will get back for more doubts.

    --rk

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dolda2000
    What exactly are you referring to with "the backup/restore utility program"? As far as I know, there is no such thing as "the" backup program in Linux. If anything could be called "the" backup program in Linux, it would be the tar, cpio, dd, etc. suite of programs.
    Hi Dolda,

    You are right, Ther are no such utilites for backup/Restore in linux. But in enterprise world it is not feasible to use tar, cpio, dd for backup.
    Hence there are commercial backup / Restore utilites in market.
    So my interest is what is there in for those utilites which make the backup/Restore process painless.

    I guess i am putting my thoughts properly.

    --rk

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    Quote Originally Posted by rajeshk
    You are right, Ther are no such utilites for backup/Restore in linux. But in enterprise world it is not feasible to use tar, cpio, dd for backup.
    I see what you mean now. However, I still don't understand why the classical Unix utilities wouldn't be feasible for backup in all situtations. What needs are there that they do not fulfill?

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