Find the answer to your Linux question:
Results 1 to 8 of 8
Hello all, I am just beginning to learn to program and have decided to start with C++. I eventually want to work up to programming 3D games that a friend ...
Enjoy an ad free experience by logging in. Not a member yet? Register.
  1. #1
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    41

    KDevelope


    Hello all, I am just beginning to learn to program and have decided to start with C++. I eventually want to work up to programming 3D games that a friend of mine is working on when he finishes his 3D animation degree. I was wondering if Kdevelope was any good to work in for writing code? If not what would be a good program to begin learning in. I have ordered a beginning C++book for Linux but don't have it yet.

  2. #2
    Linux Engineer d38dm8nw81k1ng's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Newcastle
    Posts
    793
    use vim with the syntax highlighting. it's just a text editor but it's one of the best text editors there is with minimal bloat. it just lets you concentrate on the coding. plus, once you've mastered it's advanced functions it can help speed up your coding (or so i've heard, i'm not an advanced user ). just make sure you read the man pages, they are very helpful. actually, the vim man pages are some of the best around.
    Here's why Linux is easier than Windows:
    Package Managers! Apt-Get and Portage (among others) allow users to install programs MUCH easier than Windows can.
    Hardware Drivers. In SuSE, ALL the hardware is detected and installed automatically! How is this harder than Windows' constant disc changing and rebooting?

  3. #3
    Linux Guru techieMoe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    9,496
    KDevelop, along with Eclipse and Anjuta, are what we call Integrated Development Environments, which are useful when you work with multi-source-file projects but are probably a bit of overkill for you just starting out. I recommend just using a regular text editor and compiling your programs on the command line until you get to the point where you *need* the features of an IDE.
    Registered Linux user #270181
    TechieMoe's Tech Rants

  4. #4
    Linux Guru Cabhan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Seattle, WA, USA
    Posts
    3,252
    I'm gonna agree with techieMoe here. For C++, I have yet to find an IDE that I really like, and you can't beat the commandline for simplicity. Some IDEs might also just plain confuse you.

    Having said that, if you use KDE, there is a program called kate, which is a graphical text editor geared for programmers. It integrates a terminal (which makes it easy to compile and run the program without leaving kate), and has syntax highlighting. Take a look.

  5. #5
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    41
    Thanks for the info guys. I will definitly check out both vim and kate. Will these programs compile a program when it is written or do I need something else to do that?

  6. #6
    Linux Guru dylunio's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Cymru
    Posts
    4,157
    To compile just use the g++ compiler which is a part of the gcc compiler. So to compile do:
    Code:
    g++ -o program program.cpp
    and it will compile the source code (program.cpp) so you get an executable file (program). You can use more options than this when your compiling, for these read the g++ man page.

    dylunio
    Registered Linux User #371543!
    Get force-get May The Source Be With You
    /dev/null
    /dev/null2

  7. #7
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    41
    Cool thanks. Anyone got a suggestion on a good linux c++ book to learn from? I should be getting learning C++ for Linux in 21 days today. That one any good?

  8. #8
    Linux Guru Cabhan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Seattle, WA, USA
    Posts
    3,252
    I've heard of that one, though I've not used it personally, and I hear it's good.

    I'm personally using Deitel and Deitel's "How to Program C++", which has been EXCELLENT. I would warn you to stay away from O'Reilly in this case, as their single C++-learning book (Practical C++ Programming) absolutely blows chunks.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •