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I have been wanting to learn a computer lanuage for a while now. I know what I want to do and thats mostly write small apps for myself to preform ...
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  1. #1
    Just Joined! pupdaleon's Avatar
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    Programing for linux where to start?


    I have been wanting to learn a computer lanuage for a while now. I know what I want to do and thats mostly write small apps for myself to preform ether day to day things or something else that already exsists and is frankly better but I want to use my program.

    I eventualy want to program games. and write worthwhile stuff and mabie work on free software projects with others.

    Any suggestions as to where I should start learning? I picked up C++ for dummies but I'm even to dumb for that. Maybe i should start with an easer but less powerfull lanuage?

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    I've heard million times about how easy and good python and ruby. Personally I've never tried them. Idiological issues.

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    Linux Guru techieMoe's Avatar
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    "Which programming language" is right up there with "which distro". It's going to bring hundreds of conflicting responses about everyone's personal favorite language.

    What exactly did you not understand about the C++ book? Theory, terminology, technical issues? C is the cornerstone of Linux. 98% of all the low-level utilities in Linux and a lot of the other software available are written in C or C++. It's still a very widely used language.

    There are lots of languages out there, all of which have specific uses and problems. You mentioned you wanted to eventually write games. Unless you're looking to write games for mobile phones (most of which are written in Java), you're probably going to want to learn C/C++.

    There's also nothing stopping you from learning several languages. Once you get the basic idea of any one modern language it's a lot easier to pick up a new one (much like human languages). You could start with a scripting language like Perl or Python, or even just plain old BASH scripts.

    I'm sure there will be many more recommendations soon, all with valid reasoning behind them. In the end, you have to decide for yourself what language you want to spend your time learning, and above all stick to it.
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    Never use books "For dummies". Use tutorials, examples, even manuals, but use less printed books. Indeed, some of printed books for beginers are good, but very few of them.

    As for programming language to start I advice Pascal (freepascal). Perl, Python, Ruby etc are harder to learn. But when you learn it programming you probably need to switch to C

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    Linux Guru Cabhan's Avatar
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    techieMoe is right in that once you know one language, learning others is far easier. For that reason, I tend to recommend that you learn your first language in a local class (or at least get started in a class), and after that point, you can teach yourself.

    I hear a LOT about Python (I myself don't know it) and it's apparently an excellent first language. For games, C and C++ are where you want to look, but these, while EXTREMELY powerful, can be difficult to learn as a first language.

    So yeah. It really is up to you, but I'd probably recommend Python as a starter.

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    Linux Engineer Javasnob's Avatar
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    Whatever you do, I recommend the O'Reilly books. Hands down.
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    Just Joined! pupdaleon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by techieMoe
    "Which programming language" is right up there with "which distro". It's going to bring hundreds of conflicting responses about everyone's personal favorite language.

    What exactly did you not understand about the C++ book? Theory, terminology, technical issues? C is the cornerstone of Linux. 98% of all the low-level utilities in Linux and a lot of the other software available are written in C or C++. It's still a very widely used language.

    There are lots of languages out there, all of which have specific uses and problems. You mentioned you wanted to eventually write games. Unless you're looking to write games for mobile phones (most of which are written in Java), you're probably going to want to learn C/C++.

    There's also nothing stopping you from learning several languages. Once you get the basic idea of any one modern language it's a lot easier to pick up a new one (much like human languages). You could start with a scripting language like Perl or Python, or even just plain old BASH scripts.

    I'm sure there will be many more recommendations soon, all with valid reasoning behind them. In the end, you have to decide for yourself what language you want to spend your time learning, and above all stick to it.
    Yup an like which distro i want to hear peoples opinions on them

    Well in C++ i get the basics loops, variables, functions, right up to where it starts getting technical then i get lost ( pointers, structures )


    Classes as in school is sadly out of the question.

    I'm limited in witch books i can get by whats in my local library so specific authors or titles will be harder to obtain as well as obscure languages

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    Linux Guru techieMoe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pupdaleon
    Well in C++ i get the basics loops, variables, functions, right up to where it starts getting technical then i get lost ( pointers, structures )
    I wouldn't worry if you don't immediately understand pointers. I know 30-year-veteran programmers who still have trouble with them. Some languages with automatic memory management (Java, Python) don't make you worry about pointers at all, but they have other gotchas in some situations.

    Structs are pretty much a very simple version of a class. Have you covered those yet? They're very important if you want to learn Object-Oriented programming. A struct (and also a class) is a user-created type of variable. You've probably played with int, char, and string. Those are basic data types. You can make your own with structs and classes.
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  9. #9
    Just Joined! pupdaleon's Avatar
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    Thanx everyone. i'm going to stick with C/C++ just get a better book

    Any suggestions?

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    Linux Guru AlexK's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pupdaleon
    Thanx everyone. i'm going to stick with C/C++ just get a better book

    Any suggestions?
    Personally I like the Schaums series of books especially for C and C++. The author explains the key concepts and then gives examples on the theory, including some worked examples.

    Other than that there are some online tutorials/howtos you can reference, e.g. www.cprogramming.com . I am sure others will have other links and suggestions.
    Life is complex, it has a real part and an imaginary part.

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