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type "lsmod"....then, if the hardward is new, what are some of the reasons that it won't work? My understanding is that if a "driver" (say, 8139too for a NIC) is ...
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  1. #1
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    If a module is listed when you


    type "lsmod"....then, if the hardward is new, what are some of the reasons that it won't work?

    My understanding is that if a "driver" (say, 8139too for a NIC) is listed then you type "lsmod", then Linux "sees" the hardware and everything should work. Is this correct?

    Thanks,

    Peetem

  2. #2
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    That's not entirely true -- the fact that a module is in the output of lsmod doesn't imply that Linux can talk to it; it just implies that it has the support loaded. To find out whether Linux sees your NIC, type
    Code:
    /sbin/lspci
    and look for it in the output. If you see it there, then Linux knows the card is around.

    Hope this helps.
    Situations arise because of the weather,
    And no kinds of love are better than others.

  3. #3
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    Well....I see several pieces of hardware...

    and sure enough, my NIC is listed.

    Because this is the case, if I cannot get my NIC to activate, the their is probably a cable or setting problem?

    Thanks for your help!

    Pat

    Quote Originally Posted by dan@george
    That's not entirely true -- the fact that a module is in the output of lsmod doesn't imply that Linux can talk to it; it just implies that it has the support loaded. To find out whether Linux sees your NIC, type
    Code:
    /sbin/lspci
    and look for it in the output. If you see it there, then Linux knows the card is around.

    Hope this helps.

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  5. #4
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    Usually a hardware problem is one of the last things I would suspect, but it's possible. A settings problem seems more likely. Tell us more about your network: I use the same module, 8139too, so I can probably help you some.

    Are there other boxes on your network, or is this one directly connected to the Internet?
    What's the output of "/sbin/ifconfig -a eth0"? This should be information about how your card is configured.
    Can you ping other machines? For example, does "ping -c4 216.239.57.147" get any responses? What about "ping -c4 www.google.com"?
    Any info you can scrape up will be helpful in solving your problem.
    Situations arise because of the weather,
    And no kinds of love are better than others.

  6. #5
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    The output data I got....

    listed a bunch of parameters, most all set to zero except for HWaddr (which I guess is the NIC's hardware address), MTU v(1500), and the interrupt (set to 3).

    The box is connected directly to the internet.

    When I typed "ping 216.239.57.147" I got "Network Unavailable"

    On boot when it looks for the eth0 IP, I get "Failed". However, the card's light's are on and one is blinking (I only have 2 lights on thsi card, not 3).

    I'm about to pull my hair out.....thanks again for any help!

    Peetem

    Quote Originally Posted by dan@george
    Usually a hardware problem is one of the last things I would suspect, but it's possible. A settings problem seems more likely. Tell us more about your network: I use the same module, 8139too, so I can probably help you some.

    Are there other boxes on your network, or is this one directly connected to the Internet?
    What's the output of "/sbin/ifconfig -a eth0"? This should be information about how your card is configured.
    Can you ping other machines? For example, does "ping -c4 216.239.57.147" get any responses? What about "ping -c4 www.google.com"?
    Any info you can scrape up will be helpful in solving your problem.

  7. #6
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    If you know what your IP address should be, enter as root
    Code:
    ifconfig eth0 address 1.2.5.3
    ifconfig eth0 netmask 255.255.255.0
    (with 1.2.5.3 replaced by your IP address) After that, you should be able to ping stuff, but you might not be able to resolve hostnames into addresses yet. (i.e. "ping 216.239.57.147" would work but "ping www,google.com" wouldn't).

    If your IP address is assigned automatically, then try getting (if you don't already have them) the ifup and ifdown utilities. With those, you can just type
    Code:
    ifup eth0
    to fetch your IP address, and it sets up all your ifconfig stuff too.

    Let me know how this works out. :rock:
    Situations arise because of the weather,
    And no kinds of love are better than others.

  8. #7
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    OK, this is confounding me.....

    I typed ifup eth0 and got the message (and I'm paraphrasing) "Determining IP"...or soemthing like that.....

    Then it comes back and messages ...."Failed".

    So we know this.....

    1) The module is loaded
    2) The system "sees" the card
    3) It can't determine the IP....so it can't talk to the card?

    This is strange.....should I try another card? I tried some other one earlier this week and got similar results.

    Do I need to "compile" the Kernel or something?

    Thanks a million for helping me with this!

    Peetem


    Quote Originally Posted by dan@george
    If you know what your IP address should be, enter as root
    Code:
    ifconfig eth0 address 1.2.5.3
    ifconfig eth0 netmask 255.255.255.0
    (with 1.2.5.3 replaced by your IP address) After that, you should be able to ping stuff, but you might not be able to resolve hostnames into addresses yet. (i.e. "ping 216.239.57.147" would work but "ping www,google.com" wouldn't).

    If your IP address is assigned automatically, then try getting (if you don't already have them) the ifup and ifdown utilities. With those, you can just type
    Code:
    ifup eth0
    to fetch your IP address, and it sets up all your ifconfig stuff too.

    Let me know how this works out. :rock:

  9. #8
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    No, you won't need to recompile the kernel; if you have the 8139too module and your card is in lspci, then you have the support. The fact that ifup didn't work just means that you weren't able to talk to a DHCP server to find out what your IP address should be. Ask your internet service provider how to determine your IP address.

  10. #9
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    OK, thanks and a couple of more questions...

    If you don't mind....

    Is there a "default" firewall running in Redhat which might be preventing me from having access?

    Is Linux trying to get the IP of my NIC?

    Thanks,

    Pat


    Quote Originally Posted by dan@george
    No, you won't need to recompile the kernel; if you have the 8139too module and your card is in lspci, then you have the support. The fact that ifup didn't work just means that you weren't able to talk to a DHCP server to find out what your IP address should be. Ask your internet service provider how to determine your IP address.

  11. #10
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    When you run ifup, the program tries to get your IP from a DHCP server.

    I'm not sure whether Redhat has a default firewall or anything; what comes up when you type
    Code:
    /sbin/iptables -L
    at the command line?

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