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Hi all: Just curious about the t permission. When you do the command ls -ld /tmp , the output is drwxrwxrwt . What is the t permission flag for? I ...
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  1. #1
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    What is the t stands for?


    Hi all:

    Just curious about the t permission.

    When you do the command ls -ld /tmp, the output is drwxrwxrwt.

    What is the t permission flag for? I have never seen this with any directories or files before.

  2. #2
    Administrator jayd512's Avatar
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    The t stands for a sticky bit on your permissions. It means that if you have a sticky bit on a file or directory, then only the owner of the files will be able to modify or delete those files.
    Jay

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  3. #3
    scm
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    The term "sticky" derives from its original use on UNIX executable files as a hint to the system not to swap the (frequently needed) process out too readily. (I prefer "tacky" since it begins with a 't'.)

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