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TMaYaD: yes, it's just a matter of emptying your rc4.d (rm) and then copying your rc3.d to rc4.d Even better, I would suggest that you print your directories rc3.d and ...
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  1. #11
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    TMaYaD: yes, it's just a matter of emptying your rc4.d (rm) and then copying your rc3.d to rc4.d Even better, I would suggest that you print your directories rc3.d and rc4.d and compare them: you should find them to be similar if not identical. Then you can make notes as to what to add or delete and you'll have the whole init sequence in front of you. If you want to know what a given file does, the actual script in init.d includes a short description.
    /IMHO
    //got nothin'
    ///this use to look better

  2. #12
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    Hi thanks a lot for the info

    BTW is there a cmd 2 show directory structure like tree in dos?
    ls -r can be used but I would prefer the tree like format. also can i print the output directly without piping to less and then printing

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by TMaYaD
    Hi thanks a lot for the info

    BTW is there a cmd 2 show directory structure like tree in dos?
    ls -r can be used but I would prefer the tree like format. also can i print the output directly without piping to less and then printing
    Yeah, I like seeing a tree, too. AFAIK, the file manager in the GUI is the only way, but surely, someone has written a script for that for the CLI. I'd suggest you post in "Linux Programming and Scripting" section.

    To print from the CLI, you can
    Code:
    cat filename | lpr
    I think there is a printf command, too (I don't have Linux at my office, so I can't check...). In the GUI, once the printer is set-up, you can open Print Manager and then just drag the file to the printer icon. I've been sorting through print commands, myself lately having acquired an ascii dot-matrix printer built before PostScript was invented. For that, I use fmt (format) and pipe to pr (page setup) and then to lpr.
    /IMHO
    //got nothin'
    ///this use to look better

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