Find the answer to your Linux question:
Results 1 to 9 of 9
Hi All i'm new in linux and have a question.i know that sda is for partition naming,but i don't know that what is following number of sda?for example sda6, sda7.... ...
Enjoy an ad free experience by logging in. Not a member yet? Register.
  1. #1
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    4

    what is following number of sda?


    Hi All

    i'm new in linux and have a question.i know that sda is for partition naming,but i don't know that what is following number of sda?for example sda6, sda7....

    main question is:

    how can i understand that this number refer to which partition?
    for example sda6 is for C:\ or D:\

    thanks an advanced...

  2. #2
    Trusted Penguin Irithori's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Munich
    Posts
    3,380
    Hi and welcome

    First of all, there is no C: or D: or drive letters in general.

    There is *one* directory tree, and the devices are "mounted" to certain directories.

    A whole harddisc is device /dev/sda or /dev/sdb or /dev/sdc etc.
    The partitions on a disc are numbered:
    /dev/sda1, /dev/sda2, etc
    and on a second harddisc /dev/sdb1, /dev/sdb2, /dev/sdb3 etc
    You must always face the curtain with a bow.

  3. #3
    Linux Engineer nujinini's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    1,272
    Hello & Welcome

    If I may add....Windows use letters to identify partitions examples: Drive C:\ and then Drive D:\ and so on.

    Linux system uses the one as explained clearly by Irithori

    nujinini
    Linux User #489667

  4. #4
    Super Moderator devils casper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Chandigarh, India
    Posts
    24,729
    Hi and Welcome !

    Don't worry about English language. Its not a native language of a lot of members here.
    sda1 to sda4 are for Primary or Extended Partitions only. /dev/sda5 onwards are reserved for Logical Partitions.

    You can check partition structure of your Hard disk through fdisk -l command.
    Code:
    su -
    /sbin/fdisk -l
    * Its small L in fdisk -l.
    It is amazing what you can accomplish if you do not care who gets the credit.
    New Users: Read This First

  5. #5
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    4
    thanks for all replies

    /dev/sda5 onwards are reserved for Logical Partitions.
    is it means that c:\ is sda5, d:\ is sda6 and so on?..
    what about when we change for example d:\ letter to s:\?

  6. #6
    oz
    oz is offline
    forum.guy
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    arch linux
    Posts
    18,733
    Quote Originally Posted by sajjadlove View Post
    is it means that c:\ is sda5, d:\ is sda6 and so on?..
    what about when we change for example d:\ letter to s:\?
    Run the command suggested by Devils Casper above and you can see your partition layout and get a better understanding of the way drives and partition numbering work in Linux.

    The newer Linux kernels see all hard drives as scsi drives, which would be the sd part, and the letter after the sd, such as letter "a", or "b" (and so on) indicate which drive.

    For example:

    the first drive on a system would be sda

    the second drive on a system would be: sdb

    The numbers attached to the end of the sda or sdb in this case would constitute the partition number that resides on each drive.

    The first hard drive with its partitions would be:

    sda1
    sda2
    sda3

    The second drive with its partitions would be:

    sdb1
    sdb2
    sdb3
    oz

  7. #7
    Super Moderator devils casper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Chandigarh, India
    Posts
    24,729
    is it means that c:\ is sda5, d:\ is sda6 and so on?..
    If your C: Drive is a Logical Partition then it will be /dev/sda5 but I don't think that first partition of your hard disk is Logical. By default, Windows OSes need Primary Partition for installation and you can not install it in Logical unless you are dual booting or using work arounds.

    what about when we change for example d:\ letter to s:\?
    It doesn't matter in Linux. If you change C:\ to xyz or any other driver letter, Linux won't change device name assigned to it. Linux detect partitions from Partition table directly and it has nothing to do with Windows OS except partition labels, if any.

    Post the output of fdisk -l as suggested earlier.
    It is amazing what you can accomplish if you do not care who gets the credit.
    New Users: Read This First

  8. #8
    Linux Newbie
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Novosibirsk, Russia
    Posts
    145
    On Linux just forget about C: and D: there are /boot /var /tmp /home and so on. if you want to mount a Windows' filesystem (or just any additional fs ) then you should try mount sd* or hd* partitions.

  9. #9
    Super Moderator devils casper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Chandigarh, India
    Posts
    24,729
    Quote Originally Posted by Schmidt View Post
    On Linux just forget about C: and D: there are /boot /var /tmp /home and so on. if you want to mount a Windows' filesystem (or just any additional fs ) then you should try mount sd* or hd* partitions.
    Correct !

    Linux filesystem is different from Windows OSes. I would suggest sajjadlove to check this link.
    It is amazing what you can accomplish if you do not care who gets the credit.
    New Users: Read This First

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •