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I have been a Ubuntu user for quite some time, but now I'm thinking about installing a Red Hat based distro on my laptop, so that I can learn another ...
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  1. #1
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    Choosing a rpm distro


    I have been a Ubuntu user for quite some time, but now I'm thinking about installing a Red Hat based distro on my laptop, so that I can learn another area of Linux. Can someone suggest good distro?

    I'm looking for something that is stable, good repositories, up to date with latest technologies/techniques etc.
    I guess I'm after the rpm equivalent to deb based Ubuntu.

  2. #2
    Linux User zenwalker's Avatar
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    "I'm after the rpm equivalent to deb based Ubuntu."

    Don't exist (unless you stretch with Fedora) -- try Slackware or Salix (or even Gentoo), as a suggestion, should learning be the goal.

    Welcome!

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    Quote Originally Posted by zenwalker View Post
    "I'm after the rpm equivalent to deb based Ubuntu."

    Don't exist (unless you stretch with Fedora) -- try Slackware or Salix (or even Gentoo), as a suggestion, should learning be the goal.

    Welcome!
    What do you mean by "stretch"? I'm aware there's probably no such thing. I was kinda using it as an example as Ubuntu is very popular and common. I will into those suggestions thanks.

    I should probably also mention that while learning is the gaol I want something that's still reasonably user friendly as my Wife (who's not so tech savy) sometimes uses the laptop as well.

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    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    Try Scientific Linux 6. It is a clone of RHEL 6, so it is fully binary compatible, and yum/rpm based. I've been using it for my main workstation since December/January quite happily. I use Ubuntu on my laptops, but I spend 90% of my time on the workstation. I use it for x86 Linux development as well as Linux ARM, Solaris, QNX, and Android cross-platform development purposes.
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

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    Scientific sounds interesting from what I read on distro watch. I was almost expecting Fedora to be a suggestion. Any reason it hasn't been?

    So I'm down to Fedora, CentOS, Scientific, Slackware or Salix (or even Gentoo).
    Still any further suggestions?

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    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    Fedora is the "bleading edge" test suite for RHEL. CentOS is a clone of RHEL, but they are not, AFAIK, close to releasing a version 6 yet. Scientific Linux is much like CentOS, an RHEL clone, but they have released version 6 some months ago. It is produced by a team of software engineers at CERN in Switzerland and Fermi Lab here in Batavia, Illinois (where my wife is a staff physicist) to support major scientific facilities all over the world. If having the smartest people in the world working on a project means anything, this is it...
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

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    Thanks for the advice. Seem like its Scientific then.

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    Linux Enthusiast meton_magis's Avatar
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    Fedora works great for testing out what is bleading edge as Rubberman put it, and I have great fun in playing with it when it gets released. But learning from it is very dependent on if your hardware supports it well. If it doesn't, you will get frustrated.

    Since scientific linux is less experimental, it won't install programs that may have quirks on lesser used hardware. So it is generally more stable.

    There is nothing wrong with fedora, and it's what I started with about 5 years ago. If you want, download the live disc from them, and play around with it. Can't hurt.
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    Linux Guru Lakshmipathi's Avatar
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    I haven't tried scientific but I'm using Fedora for past 8 years now. May be one option would be download iso of both fedora and scientific and try it before installing any one of them. Another way would be to use Virtualbox and test both distros and choose the one you like.
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