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I'M working my way the book 'Linux + Guide 3rd ED' and it's now attempting to educate me on device files and mounting. One of the first examples in the ...
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  1. #1
    Linux Newbie
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    122

    device files and mounting


    I'M working my way the book 'Linux + Guide 3rd ED' and it's now attempting to educate me on device files and mounting. One of the first examples in the book is on mounting a floppy disk, not drive I'M assuming. When I typed in 'mkfs -t ext2 /dev/fd0' into the terminal I got an error: No such file or directory. Now I have several ideas about what might be going wrong but I just want to make sure I understand all this before I move along.
    First of all my computer doesn't even have a floppy drive in it, I don't know why a book written in 2010 would use such an example.
    After creating the fd0 folder in dev, I re-entered the command and got /dev/fd0 is not a block special device, proceed anyway(y,n)

    Again, I'M assuming this is because I don't have a floppy drive in my computer but I want to make sure I get what's actually going on here before I move along. Seeing how I can not error check this problem because I don't have a drive. Thanks.

    update

    Now I've been told to following command to mount my cd rom drive: mount -r -t iso9660 /dev/cdrom /media/cd

    What am I actually doing here? I can already through in a blank cd and view the non-existent content.

    And this is what I get when I do:


    # mount -r -t iso9660 /dev/cdrom /media/cd
    mount: wrong fs type, bad option, bad superblock on /dev/sr0,
    missing codepage or helper program, or other error
    (could this be the IDE device where you in fact use
    ide-scsi so that sr0 or sda or so is needed?)
    In some cases useful info is found in syslog - try
    dmesg | tail or so
    Last edited by Garrett85; 07-06-2011 at 10:53 PM.

  2. #2
    Linux Engineer hazel's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Harrow, UK
    Posts
    1,198
    1) Modern Linux kernels use a program called udev to create their device files dynamically at boot. So if you don't have a floppy drive, no dev/fd0 file will be created.

    2) You can create device files by hand but only by using the mknod program or the MAKEDEV script (which many distros have in the /dev directory). Just creating a file in the ordinary way doesn't work because it's not a device file. Device files are not ordinary files; they are special. But even if you did use MAKEDEV, I doubt if the resultant device file could be used if you didn't actually have the corresponding device on your machine.

    3) If you want to mount a cdrom, it must have an ISO9660 file system on it. A blank disk won't do.
    "I'm just a little old lady; don't try to dazzle me with jargon!"

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