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Can you please explain how UNIX (specifically Solaris) and Linux (specifically Red Hat 9) operates its share space? I've been told on numerous times that a UNIX box must be ...
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  1. #1
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    Question of space


    Can you please explain how UNIX (specifically Solaris) and Linux (specifically Red Hat 9) operates its share space?
    I've been told on numerous times that a UNIX box must be rebooted in order to "Free the Share Space". By that, I've been told to monitor the PIDs and as they begin to separate, that is a sign that a reboot must occur. Before I begin to analyze this, I'd like to get a better understanding of why this occurs and what causes it.

  2. #2
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    Do you mean sharespace as in over a network?
    I don't think you should need to reboot Linux for anything like that.
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    The question is about the free space of the local disk. and Memory issues with process ID starting to span wide numbers

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    I've never heard of anything like that on Linux...
    As far as I know, Linux has great memory management, and you almost never need to reboot unless you upgraded the kernel. As for free space on the disk, what do you mean by "free the share space"?
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  5. #5
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    He might be talking about swap space, not sure though

  6. #6
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    Even with swap space, it doesn't make sense... What would it mean to "free it" and why would you want to?
    Maybe it means to turn it on or off, but you can just use swapon or swapoff for that...
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  7. #7
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    Quite possibly he is referring to the cached/shared/buffered RAM usage. This is freed as soon as that RAM is needed by a program. Shared refers to memory pools called by programs. Cached is for disk cache, reducing the number and frequency of R/W to disk. Buffers are kernel buffers for general use.
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